Another boiling point question

In summary, the conversation discusses the boiling point of two alcohols, c) and d), with similar molecular weights. It is suggested that c) may have a higher boiling point due to it being more polar and able to participate in reciprocating hydrogen bonding. The conversation also mentions using chemfinder to find the answer to this question.
  • #1
In the attachment, i think the answer is c). However c) has the same molecular weight as d) and they are both alcohols. Is it that c) is not symmetrical, thus more polar as compared to d) and which is why c) should have a higher boiling point due to the stronger intermolecular forces?
 

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  • #2
wow you're really racking up the questions. If you want the absolute answer, go to
http://www.chemfinder.com

register

type up the formulas, all of the official data will be listed. Right now I'm thinking the butanol, however not quite sure; the only one which can particpate in reciprocating hydrogen bonding (each molecule accepts and donates) and has a significantly higher molecular mass (in reference to carbon chains).
 
  • #3
GCT said:
wow you're really racking up the questions. If you want the absolute answer, go to
http://www.chemfinder.com

register

type up the formulas, all of the official data will be listed. Right now I'm thinking the butanol, however not quite sure; the only one which can particpate in reciprocating hydrogen bonding (each molecule accepts and donates) and has a significantly higher molecular mass (in reference to carbon chains).

Thanks, I was right. But not too sure bout my reasoning though...
 
  • #4
do you have the answer to these questions? If so what was the answer to this question?
 
  • #5
GCT said:
do you have the answer to these questions? If so what was the answer to this question?

Nope, but i used chemfinder, and it was relevant to my answer, (mentioned in previous posts).
 
  • #6
and your answer was...
 

1. What is the boiling point of a substance?

The boiling point of a substance is the temperature at which it changes from a liquid to a gas. It is also the temperature at which the vapor pressure of the liquid equals the atmospheric pressure.

2. How does atmospheric pressure affect the boiling point?

The higher the atmospheric pressure, the higher the boiling point of a substance. This is because the increased pressure makes it harder for the liquid molecules to escape into the gas phase, requiring a higher temperature for the vapor pressure to overcome the atmospheric pressure.

3. Can the boiling point of a substance change?

Yes, the boiling point of a substance can change depending on factors such as atmospheric pressure, altitude, and the composition of the substance. For example, adding salt to water can increase its boiling point.

4. How is the boiling point of a substance determined?

The boiling point of a substance is determined through experiments in a laboratory. The most common method is to heat the substance in a closed container and measure the temperature at which the vapor pressure equals the atmospheric pressure.

5. What is the significance of the boiling point in everyday life?

The boiling point is important in many everyday activities such as cooking, sterilization, and distillation. It is also used in industries for processes such as refining crude oil and producing pharmaceuticals. Additionally, the boiling point can be used to identify and distinguish between different substances.

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