Another chain rule: easy one (1 Viewer)

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[SOLVED] another chain rule: easy one

[tex]y=xe^{-x^2}[/tex]

i have no i dea how to start.
[tex] f'= x^{x^2} or -2x^blah blah blah [/tex]

just get me started and i'll promise you i will finish it myself
 
Last edited:
1,341
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This is actually an application of the product rule, then the chain rule.
 
[tex]y=xe^{-x^2}[/tex]

i have no i dea how to start.
[tex] f'= x^{x^2} or -2x^blah blah blah [/tex]

just get me started and i'll promise you i will finish it myself
You will probably want to use the product rule and the rule for finding the derivative of [tex]e^{g(x)}[/tex]
 
1,751
1
Product rule!!!

[tex]f(x)=e^{-x^2}[/tex]

derivative of e is itself, times the derivative of it's exponent.
 
1,751
1
wow 3 replies all at 22:49 ... you just got the royal treatment :D
 

Dick

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
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Start with the product rule. When you get to needing to find d/dx(e^(-x^2)) then remember the chain rule says (f(g(x)))'=f'(g(x))*g'(x). f is exp. g(x)=-x^2. So?
 
Solved it
thanks
 

Dick

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
26,248
611
Geez. I'm really late.
 
[tex] Y'= e^{-x2}(1-2x^{2})[/tex]
thanks for the help
 
1,341
3
Looks right^^
 

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