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Anti-gravity

  1. Dec 9, 2004 #1
    Sure anti-gravity technology is possible in your garage. Bet for $1,000? and will send you the design. Anyone else interested. Russ? $1,000?


    Edit by Ivan: Split from
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=50321&page=3&pp=15
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 14, 2004
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 9, 2004 #2

    enigma

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    Sure, I'll take that bet.

    But it actually has to turn off or change gravity.

    If the gravity is still there, but some other force is providing flight or levitation, it isn't an anti-gravity device, and I win the bet. If there were an anti-gravity device, the object subjected to it would go soaring off into space at speeds in the kilometers per second at least.

    Oh, and you need to provide a mathematical model which explains what's going on.

    Still want to take the bet, pelastration?
     
  4. Dec 9, 2004 #3
    You didn't accepted the bet enigma. You put your own conditions.
    For the others: The proof/experiment will be at room (garage) temperature.
     
  5. Dec 9, 2004 #4

    enigma

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    Yep. That's what I thought.

    Paraphrased:
    I can prove that anti-gravity exists, but I don't have to prove it...

    Wanna bet?!?

    I'll counteroffer you, pelastration.

    If you can prove it to my conditions, I'll pay you $10,000. Randi will pay you $1,000,000 as well. Get cracking!
     
  6. Dec 9, 2004 #5

    russ_watters

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    Absolutely. Heck, I'd even accept some independent testing since surely, with my obvious bias, I can't be trusted (ok, well that, and I'm lazy)....

    But I'm with enigma (though I'll be slighty more generous) - first you need to define precisely what you mean by "anti-gravity." Tell me precisely what this device will do. Some people define "anti-gravity" so loosely, throwing a baseball qualifies.
     
  7. Dec 9, 2004 #6
    Enigma, your cheap.
    Is gravity a force? Yes. And you want me to cut that force without a force. With the universal scissors? Like I said ... your' cheap.
     
  8. Dec 9, 2004 #7
    Nice Russ.
    You can start: What is anti-gravity?
     
  9. Dec 9, 2004 #8
    Take any tool in your garage - say 3 kilo's - and the anti-gravity device that you will build yourself will lift the tool up to one meter. Is that height enough for you?
    The anti-gravity device with not have moving parts.
    Fair?
     
  10. Dec 9, 2004 #9

    enigma

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    Don't you see that if it isn't turning off the gravity, it isn't "anti-gravity"?

    It's electrostatic repulsion... or ionic propulsion... or something else entirely?
     
  11. Dec 9, 2004 #10
    Are you a dreamer?
    Do you really think you can cut off gravity from an object?
    If your really think that you can cut of the most fundamental force you are creating enigma's for yourself. Maybe in math you can do that but not in physical reality.

    The word "anti" means "counter".

    My bet is still open. Randi can come and check.

    What about keeping that 3 kilo's for 3 hours on 1 meter height above the garage floor?
     
  12. Dec 9, 2004 #11

    russ_watters

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    A model rocket engine has no moving parts and can lift 10 pounds.
    enigma already gave a definition that looks good to me - but you are the one making the claim, so you explain what you are claiming.

    This is so typical of this subject: there is no theory, no evidence, no experiment, no demonstrations, just word games.
    A magnet can do it forever. So what?
     
  13. Dec 10, 2004 #12

    enigma

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    pph. I can build a hovercraft in my garage. Big whoop. Or a model airplane. Even bigger whoop. or maybe I'll hang one magnet from another. Biggest whoop.

    It's intellectually dishonest in the extreme to call any of them "anti-gravity" devices.

    How did this thread get turned from ZPE into anti-gravity?
     
  14. Dec 10, 2004 #13

    Chronos

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    conditions: anti-gravity device must move a 3 Kg mass a distance of no less than 10 meters vertical [wrt earth's center of gravity and starting position] using no more than 50% of the input energy predicted by the formula W = f x d.
     
  15. Dec 10, 2004 #14
  16. Dec 10, 2004 #15

    Chronos

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    So the Americanantigravity source admits there is no science behind the fantasy of anti-gravity propulsion [which can be translated into the equivalent of free energy - moving a mass possessing body without paying the inertial dues]. What a shocking revelation. I take it there are no takers to my conditions.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2004
  17. Dec 12, 2004 #16

    Ivan Seeking

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    I see the term "antigravity" used to describe nearly any lifting force.

    One strange note: A few years ago I saw that a small grant was issued - I think a few hundred thousand dollars - to explore some kind of "gravity shield" that would reduce the weight of the shuttle by a percent or two during the first few seconds of a launch. I know the grant was issued but I have no idea what that was all about. It seems that even some technical sources are using this language incorrectly.
     
  18. Dec 12, 2004 #17

    brewnog

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    I've got a fantastic anti gravity device in my workshop.

    It's called a table. That counts, right? Can I have my money now?
     
  19. Dec 12, 2004 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    From I can see, that counts. :biggrin:
     
  20. Dec 13, 2004 #19

    russ_watters

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    I heard about that as well, but I don't see how that is misusing the term: a gravity "shield" would certainly qualify as acting against gravity itself.
     
  21. Dec 13, 2004 #20

    Ivan Seeking

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    I was assuming that no such "shield" exists, or even could in principle AFAWK, and it was just another misuse of the terminology.
     
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