Anti - japanese protests in china

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In summary: The Chinese government is allowing these protests in order to portray the Japanese in a negative light, as they are currently involved in a territorial dispute with Japan.
  • #1
stoned
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what you guys make out of recent anti-japanese protests in china ?
first: let me say that without stamp of aproval from from chinese government they would not be able to go on the street and protest,otherwise if they went they would be shot at like on tianamen square in 1989.
secondly: some chinese must have very short memory and are hypocrites, because they also invaded and enslaved defensles,sovereign nation, namely Nepal, and killed milions of nepalese and millions of their own people during Mao era.
 
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  • #2
I'd be mad at the Japanese if I were Chinese - but I haven't heard anything about that yet, can you elaborate?
 
  • #3
here you have more :
http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/asiapcf/04/10/china.japam.protest/
Apparently Chinese also have objection to Japan becoming permanent member of UN security council.
 
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  • #4
China and Japan haven't liked each other for a very long time and from what I understand they both tend to be rather ethnocentric.
 
  • #5
There are also fears that this conflict is http://goldsea.com/Asiagate/504/19stocks.html.
 
  • #6
what you guys make out of recent anti-japanese protests in china ?

I think the Japanese would do well to accept responsibility for their actions during WWII, a good start would be teaching their students about it.

That being said, I'd also like to say, China doesn't exactly have the best track record on human rights issues.
 
  • #7
I can't blame the Chinese for being mad as hell. They have just as much right to be made as the Jews at Germany.

They've certainly got more right to be mad at the Japanese for what they did during WWII then Americans have a right to be mad at the Chinese for being a communist country.

Sure, China has plenty of human rights violations and has invaded sovereign countries, but then again, so does the United States. So it seems quite ironic for Americans to be mad at the Chinese for being mad about the Japanese and throwing around words like hypocrasy.

Furthermore, it would also seem hypocritical to me for Americans to be criticizing the Japanese for failing to address it's past atrocities in school history books, since we're not really any better.
 
  • #8
all this is about Japan having seat in UN security council. Chinese protests against Japan's actions during WW2 is a smoke screan, but it might be usefull also to get some guilt money from Japanese.
 
  • #9
stoned said:
all this is about Japan having seat in UN security council. Chinese protests against Japan's actions during WW2 is a smoke screan, but it might be usefull also to get some guilt money from Japanese.

Having known a number of citizens of the PRC, I can attest that anger towards the Japanese atrocities of WWII is very, very real.
 
  • #10
Regarding the UN Council thing, I was always under the impression that since Japan lost WWII they would never be allowed on the Security Council because it would violate the UN Charter or some such. This is why Germany and Italy's bids to be on the Council have failed in the past. Am I missing something here?
 
  • #11
Andromeda321 said:
Am I missing something here?
Yeah, Germany and Italian economies arn't succumbing to American corporations. Japan is as close to America as it can get.
 
  • #12
TRCSF said:
Having known a number of citizens of the PRC, I can attest that anger towards the Japanese atrocities of WWII is very, very real.
That doesn't mean that the Chinese government really cares. I'm with Stoned in thinking that they are allowing these protests to paint the japanese in a bad light due to current territorial disputes which at least should be what the government is really concerned about.
 

Related to Anti - japanese protests in china

1. What are the reasons behind the anti-Japanese protests in China?

The anti-Japanese protests in China are primarily fueled by historical and territorial disputes between the two countries. The Chinese government and citizens believe that Japan has not fully acknowledged and apologized for its atrocities during World War II, including the Nanjing Massacre. In addition, there is ongoing tension over the ownership of the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands in the East China Sea.

2. How have these protests affected China-Japan relations?

The anti-Japanese protests have strained relations between China and Japan, leading to diplomatic and economic tensions. There have been boycotts of Japanese products in China, and the Japanese government has expressed concerns about the safety of its citizens and businesses in China. The two countries have also engaged in military posturing in the disputed territories, increasing the risk of conflict.

3. Are the anti-Japanese protests organized by the Chinese government?

It is unclear whether the Chinese government has played a direct role in organizing the anti-Japanese protests. However, the government has allowed these protests to occur, and some analysts believe that the government may be using the protests to divert attention from domestic issues and rally nationalistic sentiment among its citizens.

4. Have there been any instances of violence during these protests?

Yes, there have been reports of violence during the anti-Japanese protests in China. In some cases, protesters have attacked Japanese businesses and individuals, resulting in injuries and property damage. The Chinese government has condemned these acts of violence and has arrested some individuals involved in the protests.

5. How have other countries responded to the anti-Japanese protests in China?

Many countries have expressed concerns about the anti-Japanese protests and the potential impact on regional stability. The United States, in particular, has urged both China and Japan to exercise restraint and resolve their disputes peacefully. Some countries, such as South Korea, have also been affected by the protests due to their own complicated histories with Japan.

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