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Programs Any advice on a double major

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So I decided to go for two degrees instead of one so the goal is two associate degrees.One in Physics and the other in Mathematics any one have any advice on the this math heavy course of action I’ have set for myself.
 

jim hardy

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Physics? Math?
Sound like you're pretty cerebral !


What is it you want to do afterward ? Teach ? Research ?
Have you looked into what degrees potential employers look for on job applications ? Will associate's degrees get you into academia ?
I have only a BSEE and found out the local community colleges don't consider that enough education to let me teach, even a basic evening class.

Sooo,,My advice is

Take something that'll make you immediately valuable to an employer.
A young friend of mine took enough courses in Autocad to become pretty proficient.
He found the skill translated easily into programming CNC machines and he now heads that department for a small manufacturer of specialty marine fittings for high end yachts.
He loves his work, and the owners recognize his unusual inborn creativity and attention to detail.
Another young friend hired on with a windmill outfit. His mountain climbing hobby paid off - he ":Learned the Ropes" working on turbine blades 300 feet up in the air and now has his own company.

So were i in your shoes, i'd look around the countryside and find some kind of machinery that looks interesting.
Then i'd take a course or two related to them
and plan on working my way up the ladder by demonstrating competence and diligence.
That's the beauty of a Physics and Math - it applies to anything.

Trouble is - when we're young we've likely never been around huge machinery..

Here's a publishing house that prints trade magazines for several major industries
https://www.pennwell.com/index.html/index.html

i'd wager if you fill out their contact form
https://www.pennwell.com/contact.html
and write a letter to one of their executives (see https://www.pennwell.com/about/executive-team.html )
explaining that you're a young man trying to set a course for his life's work
and would very much appreciate copies of the current magazines for each industry shown on their industry page
https://www.pennwell.com/industries.html
so as to broaden your horizons

you'll get a handful of magazines .
Look at the advertisers - it's an eye opener just mow many niche and specialty suppliers are out there.
Then start writing those advertisers inquiring about summer jobs and internships .

Good luck !

old jim
 

Klystron

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Consider your goals after community college. If you plan an transferring credits in conjunction with a bachelor (4-year) degree, work with advisors and teachers to ensure your core courses transfer with at least partial credit awarded. Physics and science courses that enable an associative degree may lack rigor required for a bachelor degree. Ask universities you might attend in the future if your courses are accepted.

Compromise might be in order. Computer Science or Chemistry AA degrees may include the same math and physics courses you mention while opening up lucrative career fields.
 

Vanadium 50

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I'm not sure why you would want to do this, but looking at a couple of course catalogs it appears that the overlap is about 90%. We're talking one extra class. This doesn't seem any more math heavy than just doing math, and one course more than just doing physics.

If you want to go on, though, you will need to take more math. That's unavoidable.
 
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Well I looked at the Chemistry degree and it differs by two courses so i might be better off by waiting to apply for graduation and take these two courses and get three associates for about the price of one. Might be taking this path if i can work it out with advisor. The degrees are all transferable to four year colleges it just a matter of doing the work. The answer Jim’s question mostl likely I would like todo research, but teaching not out of the question.
 
3
1
I'm not sure why you would want to do this, but looking at a couple of course catalogs it appears that the overlap is about 90%. We're talking one extra class. This doesn't seem any more math heavy than just doing math, and one course more than just doing physics.

If you want to go on, though, you will need to take more math. That's unavoidable.
Yeah that’s what where i was going with it, keeping my options open with the transfer agreement
 

symbolipoint

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So I decided to go for two degrees instead of one so the goal is two associate degrees.One in Physics and the other in Mathematics any one have any advice on the this math heavy course of action I’ have set for myself.
Easily possible at that level. Think of it like this: An associate in Physics degree will require about as much Mathematics course-work as an associate in Mathematics degree.
 

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