Any book recommendations for strengthening my understanding of the basics of mechanics?

  • #1
WadeGlenn
8
1
TL;DR Summary: Hey everyone. I need help with clearing my concepts of mechanics. I am really confused. Are there any good books which can make me understand concepts in a better way?

Book recommendations for mechanics (for improving basics).
 
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  • #2
WadeGlenn said:
TL;DR Summary: Hey everyone. I need help with clearing my concepts of mechanics. I am really confused. Are there any good books which can make me understand concepts in a better way?

Book recommendations for mechanics (for improving basics).
Welcome, Wade!

Any book will properly cover basics.
See what is locally available in your library or contry.

There are many websites offering solid explanations and illustrations.
I mostly like these ones:
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/index.html#mechcon

https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-physics/
:cool:
 
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  • #4
WadeGlenn said:
Hey everyone. I need help with clearing my concepts of mechanics. I am really confused. Are there any good books which can make me understand concepts in a better way?

Book recommendations for mechanics (for improving basics)
Could you be more specific about your confusion?
 
  • #5
Well, whenever I try to solve questions, I get stuck. I go back to the theory again and then come back to the questions once more. It's like a limbo. Also, I feel like the books I have right now are not engaging or fulfilling. I'm not sure if I'm making a lot of sense, but I tried to explain.
 
  • #6
WadeGlenn said:
Also, I feel like the books I have right now are not engaging or fulfilling. I'm not sure if I'm making a lot of sense, but I tried to explain.
I should also have asked what books you are currently using so as not to recommend them.
 
  • #7
gleem said:
I should also have asked what books you are currently using so as not to recommend them.
Well, those are not very famous books and are not used by a lot of people. So, you can just recommend all the books you think can help me.
 
  • #8
Could you give us an example of a problem that you are having difficulty with?
 
  • #9
Screenshot 2024-06-12 222103.png
 
  • #10
So where is the issue, setting it up or doing the math?
 
  • #11
Oh, this is a "problem solving techniques" issue in the simplest theory, classical mechanics. A tutor or a teacher could explain how to set things up, basically learn you how to think, where to start and where to finish. I don't know of books written precisely on this (basically meant to replace the person), but I would appreciate if anyone knows and could recommend.
 
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  • #12
gleem said:
So where is the issue, setting it up or doing the math?
I don't think there is an issue with the math. I believe I face problem in approaching the question. How to go about it, how to know what am supposed to use to get to the answer. It just doesn't click.
 
  • #13
dextercioby said:
Oh, this is a "problem solving techniques" issue in the simplest theory, classical mechanics. A tutor or a teacher could explain how to set things up, basically learn you how to think, where to start and where to finish. I don't know of books written precisely on this (basically meant to replace the person), but I would appreciate if anyone knows and could recommend.
Well, you are right. But I personally believe that when you see a new question it is quite normal for you to take time and do it wrong multiple times. But I also think that you do reach to the answer if you are conceptually equipped. On the other hand, if your concepts are weak, you won't be able to answer it even after trying really hard. Therefore, I should work on my concepts too. Again, I completely agree with you. It would be awesome if anyone could recommend books about problem solving techniques specifically.
 
  • #14
Try "Physics for Scientists and Engineers, a Strategic Approach" by Randall Knight
 
  • #15
Thanks!
 
  • #16
WadeGlenn said:
I don't think there is an issue with the math. I believe I face problem in approaching the question. How to go about it, how to know what am supposed to use to get to the answer. It just doesn't click
The physics in your example problem is elementary the only stumbling block might be the right mathematical expression to work with. That said, perhaps a text with more examples and a wide range of problems might help e.g., Physics for Scientists and Engineers, by Serway is well illustrated with hundreds of worked examples and about 3000 problems.
Edit: this is a general physics text but will help to develop a reliable problem-solving strategy.
 
  • #17
dextercioby said:
Oh, this is a "problem solving techniques" issue in the simplest theory, classical mechanics. A tutor or a teacher could explain how to set things up, basically learn you how to think, where to start and where to finish. I don't know of books written precisely on this (basically meant to replace the person), but I would appreciate if anyone knows and could recommend.
Isn't Morin's book like this?
 

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