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Any Lost fans here?

  1. May 11, 2010 #1
    The show is going to be wrapping up soon. It's one of the few television programs I enjoyed. Any fans here? Or do people get too turned off by the scientific wackiness?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 11, 2010 #2
    I have never watched it but I became somewhat interested recently when I found references to it in a game I was playing. Until I then I never even knew what it was about. I thought it was just a modernized Gilligan's Island.
     
  4. May 12, 2010 #3

    Chi Meson

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    In the course of a single year, I watched the first 4 seasons on DVD. THis allowed me to fast forward through a lot of filler, but subsequently I think I may have missed a few things. Nonetheless, It started to annoy me in the 3rd & 4th season , yet I still watched.

    Through the last couple of "half-seasons" I had been waiting a day after broadcast and watching it streaming (fewer commercials). But the last two weeks I have been tuning in for the broadcast. That must mean something, and I think I know what it is...

    I currently have more time on Tuesdays than Wednesdays.

    But I like many other "hooked" have to see how they resolve this business. It will either be the most amazing achievement of reticulated plot weaving ever accomplished, or a cheap Deus ex machina cop out.

    Or something in-between. Deus ex machina seems to be leading at this point, but we'll see. There has been plenty of genius demonstrated along the way, and boldness too. How can a show survive after killing off so many "favorite" characters?

    I do not have the ability to not follow it so close to the end, but I will be glad when it is over.

    Actually it appears to be "Dei ex machina," right?
     
  5. May 12, 2010 #4

    Averagesupernova

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    I was hooked right away. There were a couple seasons that were a slight disappointment but I still like it. As for the scientific wackiness? There isn't hardly ANYTHING on TV that isn't weak in that area. Mainly there isn't anything else on TV like it and I don't care for 99% of what else is on TV.
     
  6. May 12, 2010 #5
    That's what I thought too (more or less a rip-off of lord of the flies with some sci-fi elements and reality show drama), and I had never bothered to watch it. After many people had told me it was the best thing ever, I watched the first five seasons on the internet, and I have to say I was wrong, it's pretty great.

    I think it's the kind of thing that is actually better viewing on the internet, since it's a serialized story. Watching it week to week can be kind of frustrating, waiting for resolutions of mysteries that don't come (or come eventually, but as more of a deal where by the time something is "revealed", it has become incrementally obvious in a sort of ambiguous way.)

    It's also very well scripted, as watching from the beginning, it's clear that most things were plotted far in advance and they are not just "making it up" as they go along.
     
  7. May 12, 2010 #6

    Kerrie

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    HUGE fan of Lost right here :biggrin: Followed the show since season 2. I think the wackiness is perfect for the setting.
     
  8. May 12, 2010 #7

    Chi Meson

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    In the last episode, it seems they were loudly touting that fact, when they overlapped the scene from the 3rd episode, 6 years ago, as if to say:

    "Remember that bag with the two stones? Yeah? Next to the skeletons? Forgot about it didn't you? Well, here's what they are!"
     
  9. May 12, 2010 #8

    Janus

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    I doubt that anyone who has really followed the show had forgotten about it. The "black and White" theme seems to recur quite a bit in the show. For instance: later that same season, Claire sees Locke in a dream and he has one white and one black eye.
     
  10. May 12, 2010 #9

    Kerrie

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    I totally forgot about that scene!! Speaking of Claire, I am still wondering what her huge significance might be?? She and Desmond...??
     
  11. May 12, 2010 #10
    i've watched it a few times, but never became a "fan". the writers have given themselves the easy out of magic. star trek writers started doing this with time travel, and for me it just gets incoherent after a while. it's OK for X-Files where most episodes are kind of their own self-contained story, but for anything much bigger than that it gets tiresome.
     
  12. May 13, 2010 #11
    It was curious that "Locke" didn't mind her not getting on the sub. Maybe she wasn't a candidate?
     
  13. May 13, 2010 #12
    I actually found this idea to be very compelling. One of the central themes, which was made pretty explicit by the last epeisode, is the conflict between a faith based view of the world and a more materialist based view. The "energy" that is the route of the island's unusual properties is described, depending on the point of view of the characters, as either a mystical force or a strange electromagnetic phenomenon. Either way, the desire to understand it, possess it, or use it for one's own ends is equally corrupting.

    There is also the motif of the faithful trying to "guard" the hidden knowlegde from those who understand it. The roles of Jacob versus the other brother become more complex, as it's not in fact, a simple tale of black versus white, but of two competing world views, originally personified by Jack vs. Locke, who now after six years have switched roles in a sense.
     
  14. May 13, 2010 #13

    Janus

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    No, she wasn't, or at least wasn't one anymore. She was a candidate, but her name was crossed out, as was Kate's.
     
  15. May 14, 2010 #14
    This is pretty much how I feel about it too. The first season opened a lot of questions, but the plot made sense. That kept me watching. Then somewhere in the third season, after the hatch exploded all the weirdness started to take over. I'm also dreading a "Deus ex machina" ending. The writers of BSG did that and it seemed to leave the conclusion hanging unattached to the story. An ending that leaves a big question mark is ok with me, but not a story that falls flat. At this point I'll stay tuned just to see what they do with it.
     
  16. May 14, 2010 #15

    Janus

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    Well, according to the creators, at least some questions will be left open at the conclusion of the series.
     
  17. May 24, 2010 #16

    Chi Meson

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    Well, it wasn't "A."

    If by "some," you mean "essentially all," then that's right.
     
  18. May 24, 2010 #17
    No offence, it's american made so therefore it'll be a cop out.

    If found this (almost) universally to be the case with a lot of shows for a number of reasons.

    1. They keep it going too long. "leave them wanting more" is the best idea ever for a show. However for the tv people this means there is still some cash to be squeezed from the show. So you end up with a ravaged husk, that people start to lose interest in.

    2. The 20odd episode format makes it quite hard to keep an interesting pace. You get cracking episodes, but you also get really naff ones.

    3. American tv execs seem to think that you guys are all thick as...well that you need to be held by the hand. In most series, everything is neatly wrapped up for 'closure'. Or they go too far the other way and leave everything completely up in the air (I'd go as far as saying the ending seemed rushed together), they havent seemed to have found a happy medium.

    I can't even think of any particular examples, I can jsut remember the feelings I have when a show ends.


    EDIT: Didn't read the entire thread, so has it ended now? And was it any good?
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2010
  19. May 24, 2010 #18

    Chi Meson

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    Yep, all over, thank god.

    "Was it any good?"

    Well, it wasn't completely "bad," but it certainly did not live up to the potential set by the first two seasons. In fact, it seemed to be the finale to a different show; there was LOST:the first two seasons" then "LOST: leading up to the finale."
     
  20. May 24, 2010 #19

    Kerrie

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    I would have to agree with that. It would seem that the ending wasn't really known until after the show was on for a few years and the writers went with some direction.

    The ending wasn't what I hoped, but still left me pondering for hours about possibilities and maybes.
     
  21. May 24, 2010 #20
    My roommate was just watching the final episode, when about a few minutes in it I heard a loud "SERIOUSLY?!??!?!?!?" - when I checked with him he was no longer watching it, said it was simply too lame to waste time.

    I've been watching the first season, but the show got worse and worse, those are the risks of having to figure out things on the run instead of having a solid script from start to end...

    I might say "LOST" lost me pretty quickly :)
     
  22. May 24, 2010 #21

    Jonathan Scott

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    Unlike most recent episodes leading towards the ending, the finale didn't seem to make much sense at all. It all seemed to be leading up to some sort of intelligent resolution, but then just sank without trace in a sort of glowing syrup.
     
  23. May 24, 2010 #22

    rcgldr

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    I only watched the last 7 or so episodes, after hearing it was going to end. I assumed that knowing that there was going to be a final episode, that the series would be improved, as was in the case of DollHouse, a mediocre sci-fi series that seemed to be going nowhere, until they knew it was going to be canceled, and the writers responded by doing a reasonable job of turing a never ending series into a coherent story.

    Getting back to Lost, it's ending reminded me of Jacob's Ladder. In Jacob's Ladder, the movie goes off in ramdom and bizarre directions, with no seeming purpose, then at the end it switches to a scene where the main character sees his dead daughter who leads him into the light. Then it switches to reality where the entire movie is revealed to simply be the hallucinations of a man dying from a combat wound.

    Given this analogy, the entire series, including all of the characters and events, could simply be the hallucinations of a comatose and dying Jack. Then again, Bart Simpson's analysis seems to be just as good, it was all the dog's dream.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2010
  24. May 25, 2010 #23
    ::Spoilers::







    The finale wasn't great; it wasn't terrible. It definetly seemed like they could have tried something a bit more ambitious, and based on heights reached before, the bar was set very high, and was not reached.
    That said, I have to give them credit for pursuing their vision. It would have been fairly easy to do an apocalyptic-battle style finale that probably would have made most people happy, and wrap things up in a neat package.

    They went for the more literary ending. It seemed like they were going that way from the "Across the Sea" episode, where it turned out Jacob and his brother weren't the all knowing beings they seemed, but were players in some cycle they didn't understand.

    The ending kept it ambiguous, which was very true to the themes of the show. It wasn't clear that the light going out, and Locke with a real body escaping, would have actually lead to anything particularly bad happening. It's up to the viewer to decide; did all this have a purpose or not? Was it just a series of random, senseless events, or did it matter somehow? It's clear from the ending that Jack thought that it did, and that he had fulfilled his "purpose." I actually thought the scene with Jack dying was very well done. He was a well written tragic character. At first he seems like a too good to be true hero, then subtly he's revealed to have major character flaws (like blaming his dad for everything, including the failure of his marriage). As time goes on, he makes more and more wrong decisions, till he eventually gets to to the point of suicidal junkie. I think the implication was, that had the plane crashed, this was where he was heading. Or maybe not (Jacob did "touch" all the people he chose). He eventually finds his purpose, which is apparently to kill Jacob's brother and then die saving the island. It's a sad arc, eventually since maybe it all didn't matter. The final shot with Vincent (the dog) laying next to him as he sees the people he saved and he closes his eyes was immensely sad. Of course, he's been "flashing" to some world/purgatory/alternate dimension where the people aren't as flawed (or maybe weren't tocuhed by Jacob, or whatever), so there is some closure, but it's a sad sort of closure, and that world seems less real, and more of just an "occurrence at owl creek" type of a deal.

    Which is something that I'm not sure really worked. Did the alternate reality really add anything? Was it necessary to spend half the season there? The ending would have been slightly different and sadder, but still satisying, without that, and there could have been some other reason desmond was motivated to unplug the hole. It did seem like an odd choice, and probably the most disappointing aspect of the finale. I guess I can understand that the writers wanted it as a sort of epilogue to give all the character arcs resolution.




    The writers said they were influenced by the dark tower series, and this did remind me alot of the final book, which was brilliant at times but ultimately frustrating. This wasn't as bad as that, but I guess i would have liked to see some other approach to ending it.

    As far as the questions not being answered, i don't think they weren't. Most of the mysteries were solved by the end, except for the "ultimate" mysteries, did all this have a purpose, where did the island come from, what is the energy "really", etc.

    But how lame would it have been to have the answer be that the island wanted you to accept jesus christ as your personal savior. There were motifs that were never completely explained, but I saw that as part of the cyclical mystery (the fertility/pregnancy stuff comes to mind.) The basic questions, like who was this guy, why was this, what was going on here, etc. were all answered, although you may have to go back and think about the narrative for a second. As I mentioned, it seemed sort of clear from the Jaco origin story that they weren't going to give an "ultimate" explanation for the island.


    I really liked Locke, inhabited by Jacob's brother, being the one saying it was all meaningless and fighting Jack, who had done a complete role reversal from his earlier interaction with Locke as the man of reason. If you recall, Locke visited Jack, who told him he was crazy thinking that it all had a purpose, before he was about to attempt suicide. But Jack desperately needed his own life to have a purpose, and "killed" Locke again, representing the other perspective.





    ::Spoliers::
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2010
  25. May 25, 2010 #24
    Here's an example of questions I'm glad they didn't answer. Did Ben execute "the purge" on his own initiative, or was he orderd to by Jacob? Jacob was not a great guy in some respects. He was willing to ruin lives, and create situations that he knew would get people killed to "win" his game. His adopted mother slaughtered the men who were trying to build the wheel to "protect" the island. Did he do the same thing? What was up with the life restoring water? Did it really turn people evil? Sayid was still capable of sacrifice, and Ben ultimately became a slightly better guy. On the other hand, what accounts for what happened to Danielle's team? That kind of stuff, which is left open to interpretation made it a more interesting and thoughtful show then had those answers been spelled out explicitly.
     
  26. May 25, 2010 #25
    So why was this show so popular again? I tryed watching a few episodes and each time I was like this is the worst version of survivor ever. It was just blah imo.
     
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