Any reason for this paradox?

  • Thread starter PhysicoRaj
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  • #1
PhysicoRaj
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I'm sure there must be some explanation to why these kind of things appear..

firstly,
consider a=b
ab=b2
a2-ab=a2-b2
a(a-b)=(a+b)(a-b)
a=a+b
since a=b,
b=b+b
1=2 !??


then this one-
(100-100)/(100-100)
=[(10+10)(10-10)/10(10-10)]
=2

Anything has gone wrong?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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I'm sure there must be some explanation to why these kind of things appear..

firstly,
consider a=b
ab=b2
a2-ab=a2-b2
a(a-b)=(a+b)(a-b)
a=a+b
Since a = b, then a - b = 0. To get to the line above, you divided by zero, which is never allowed.
since a=b,
b=b+b
1=2 !??


then this one-
(100-100)/(100-100)
=[(10+10)(10-10)/10(10-10)]
=2

Anything has gone wrong?
Here you cancelled (10 - 10)/(10 - 10), which is 0/0. You can't do that.
 
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