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Any reason for this paradox?

  1. Feb 14, 2014 #1

    PhysicoRaj

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    Gold Member

    I'm sure there must be some explanation to why these kind of things appear..

    firstly,
    consider a=b
    ab=b2
    a2-ab=a2-b2
    a(a-b)=(a+b)(a-b)
    a=a+b
    since a=b,
    b=b+b
    1=2 !??


    then this one-
    (100-100)/(100-100)
    =[(10+10)(10-10)/10(10-10)]
    =2

    Anything has gone wrong?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 14, 2014 #2

    Mark44

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    Insights Author

    Staff: Mentor

    Since a = b, then a - b = 0. To get to the line above, you divided by zero, which is never allowed.
    Here you cancelled (10 - 10)/(10 - 10), which is 0/0. You can't do that.
     
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