Anyone Else Have Sleep Issues?

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Drakkith

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So apparently I have issues with my sleep and according to a sleep study I had done I only spend about 1.5% of the night in stage 3 sleep. During the day I usually experience significant fatigue and it is extremely difficult to do things like read, work, calculate the cube root of pi... you know, the important stuff.

So I was just wondering if anyone else had any issues with sleep and how you dealt with the fatigue.
 

WWGD

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I have been helped by over-the-counter stuff: Zzquil; Nyquil is too strong. I sleep better, deeper, but make sure you have coffee ready when you wake up.
 

TheDemx27

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I'm on summer vacation, so I have no reason to go to bed early, and I have a certain amount of 'sleep drunkenness' when I get up. I personally have two options.

Unhealthy Way:
Drink a few cups of black coffee in the morning, and then mid-day I have a cup of real maple syrup. The syrup helps the most.

Healthy Way:
Go on a bike ride or do some exercise or something. Physical labor is the best way to ensure a good sleep, and therefor, less fatigue.
 

WWGD

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I'm on summer vacation, so I have no reason to go to bed early, and I have a certain amount of 'sleep drunkenness' when I get up. I personally have two options.

Unhealthy Way:
Drink a few cups of black coffee in the morning, and then mid-day I have a cup of real maple syrup. The syrup helps the most.

Healthy Way:
Go on a bike ride or do some exercise or something. Physical labor is the best way to ensure a good sleep, and therefor, less fatigue.
That does not work for all. I exercise regularly and I have no coffee 6 hrs. before bed time and I still have trouble both falling and staying asleep.
 

Evo

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I suffer from chronic sleep deprivation. I've been through 2 sleep studies, they said I wake up approximately every 19 minutes and that was with taking Ambien. I take 2 different medications for sleep, one to help me go to sleep and another to keep me from waking up, so I can get 2-3 hours of sleep. See if you can work naps in during the day, and ask about sleep meds.
 
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During the day I usually experience significant fatigue and it is extremely difficult to do things like read, work, calculate the cube root of pi... you know, the important stuff.
In case you didn't sleep well last night, Drakkith, I'll lighten the load for you today. The cube root of Pi is 1.464591887561523263020142527263790391738596855627937174357255... :biggrin:
 

Drakkith

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I suffer from chronic sleep deprivation. I've been through 2 sleep studies, they said I wake up approximately every 19 minutes and that was with taking Ambien. I take 2 different medications for sleep, one to help me go to sleep and another to keep me from waking up, so I can get 2-3 hours of sleep. See if you can work naps in during the day, and ask about sleep meds.
Unfortunately I can't fall asleep during the day fast enough for a nap to be effective unless I have at least an hour or two, which I don't if I'm working. I've tried several different sleep meds such as ambien and melatonin, but haven't had any benefit. And the ambien made me have some kind of hallucinating nightmare and I woke up with double vision. I went to the ER and was told not to take it again.

The psychologist I just started seeing may have more options. I'm hoping so at least.
 

Drakkith

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In case you didn't sleep well last night, Drakkith, I'll lighten the load for you today. The cube root of Pi is 1.464591887561523263020142527263790391738596855627937174357255... :biggrin:
Ah, thanks so much, Dirac!
 
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So apparently I have issues with my sleep and according to a sleep study I had done I only spend about 1.5% of the night in stage 3 sleep. During the day I usually experience significant fatigue and it is extremely difficult to do things like read, work, calculate the cube root of pi... you know, the important stuff.

So I was just wondering if anyone else had any issues with sleep and how you dealt with the fatigue.
Did the results of the study state anything about sleep apnea? Frequent events of apnea can keep people out of deep sleep. Random leg movement (RLM) can do the same thing.
 

Evo

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Unfortunately I can't fall asleep during the day fast enough for a nap to be effective unless I have at least an hour or two, which I don't if I'm working. I've tried several different sleep meds such as ambien and melatonin, but haven't had any benefit. And the ambien made me have some kind of hallucinating nightmare and I woke up with double vision. I went to the ER and was told not to take it again.

The psychologist I just started seeing may have more options. I'm hoping so at least.
That's sad. Back in the good ole days, they gave you REAL sleeping pills like seconal. but since so many people killed themselves with it, doctors won't prescribe it. :devil:
 

DataGG

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So apparently I have issues with my sleep and according to a sleep study I had done I only spend about 1.5% of the night in stage 3 sleep. During the day I usually experience significant fatigue and it is extremely difficult to do things like read, work, calculate the cube root of pi... you know, the important stuff.

So I was just wondering if anyone else had any issues with sleep and how you dealt with the fatigue.
I suffer from chronic sleep deprivation. I've been through 2 sleep studies, they said I wake up approximately every 19 minutes and that was with taking Ambien. I take 2 different medications for sleep, one to help me go to sleep and another to keep me from waking up, so I can get 2-3 hours of sleep. See if you can work naps in during the day, and ask about sleep meds.
Why do this kind of things happen? Is it psychological? Did you guys have your blood checked (obviously you did...)?

Were you always like this?
 

Drakkith

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Did the results of the study state anything about sleep apnea? Frequent events of apnea can keep people out of deep sleep. Random leg movement (RLM) can do the same thing.
Yes, I had almost no apneas or hypopneas nor any RLM.

Why do this kind of things happen? Is it psychological? Did you guys have your blood checked (obviously you did...)?

Were you always like this?
Yes, I've had blood work done. Nothing was found. I've been like this just about as long as I can remember. At least since high school.
 

Evo

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My problems are physical and started after a seriously botched surgery, but I have always been an extremely light sleeper/insomniac, since the operation it became severe chronic sleep deprivation.
 

Drakkith

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My problems are physical and started after a seriously botched surgery, but I have always been an extremely light sleeper/insomniac, since the operation it became severe chronic sleep deprivation.
Have you tried Acme's new and improved Sleep Inducer 9000? Guaranteed to put you in at least a moderate coma or your money back!

acme_mallet_by_cdot284-d38c6u9.png
 

StatGuy2000

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From what I have read so far, insomnia (excluding those that are caused or co-morbid with other medical conditions, such as heart disease, sleep apnea, mental disorders, etc.) are often associated with disruptions in the release of stress/awakening hormone cortisol (release of large amounts of cortisol in the evening occurs in primary insomnia, and patients with insomnia wake up with significantly lower cortisol levels than those with regular sleeping patterns). This suggests that drugs related to calming mood disorders or anxiety (e.g. antidepressants) would regulate cortisol levels and prevent insomnia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insomnia#Cortisol

Of course, this needs to be assessed by proper medical professionals (e.g. psychiatrist, sleep experts, etc.)
 
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Historically I haven't had too much problems getting to sleep, but I would always find throughout the day I'd have huge drowsyness issues and what not.
Over the past couple months I've been hitting the gym 3-4 times a week and something surprising (well not really I suppose) has happened.
For the first couple weeks I was extra tired, which was good cause I'd fall right asleep, but still found I was drowsy during the day.
Then I started having problems falling asleep. I was going to bed at the same time and would just lie there for a few hours. I expected to have really rough days following but it never happened. Now I'm going to bed 60-90 min later than I normally would (fall right asleep), getting up usually 50min earlier than I used to and still no drowsy problems.
So try more exercise?

Orrrrrrrrr get a job selling soap :P
 

Choppy

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I don't know if this will help at all, but for what it's worth... here as some tips on how to get a good sleep.

1. Routine. Routine. Routine. As much as possible, try to keep a consistent sleep schedule. Go to bed and wake up the same time every day.

2. Diet. It's hard to get very specific here, but the general advice of "eat healthy" is the basic idea. Avoid foods that make you lethargic during the day and the foods that can give you heartburn in the evenings.

3. Regular Exercise. Personally I find I sleep better when I exercise earlier in the day, but I think the real key is to get regular exercise. It's difficult to relax if you have a lot of pent up energy.

4. Organize. It's easy to lie awake at night, with your head swimming in thoughts and reminders of what you shouldn't forget to do tomorrow. Writing down a list of what you need to do the next day as part of your evening routine can help you to keep those head spinning thoughts out of your mind while you're trying to relax.

5. Avoid screen time before going to bed. Darkness can often serve as a biological queue for sleep, but starting at a lit-up screen for a couple of hours before bed can interfere with this. Beware of the content as well. Your brain won't sleep under conditions of stress (see Statguy's post), so things like the news that might get you all wound up might be well avoided.

6. Read before going to bed. This gives your mind something to focus on. It's quiet, relaxing activity.

7. If you can't sleep, it's okay to be content with simply relaxing in the darkness. Apparently even lying awake in the dark is better for you than getting up and watching television, or trying to be productive.

8. Avoid caffeine and other stimulants. I'm just as guilty as anyone of breaking this one. It might be more appropriate to suggest not just avoiding it later in the day, but being aware of (and limiting) your doses as well.
 
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Chronos

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Try green tea about an hour before you go to bed. It's pretty relaxing.
 
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5. Avoid screen time before going to bed. Darkness can often serve as a biological queue for sleep, but starting at a lit-up screen for a couple of hours before bed can interfere with this. Beware of the content as well. Your brain won't sleep under conditions of stress (see Statguy's post), so things like the news that might get you all wound up might be well avoided.
What's funny is keeping a TV or computer on helps me sleep. I have Tourette's and my tics can keep me awake if I don't occupy my mind with something until I'm very tired. Recently I have been getting in the habit of putting my TV on a timer, though. I'll occasionally read until I'm sleepy as well. Usually video games does the trick, though. =)
 

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