Anyone into lifting weights?

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  • #26
Astronuc
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I work mainly with two 20 Lb and two 40 Lb dumbells. I alternate between the 20 pounders with lots of reps and for hyperextended exercises, and the 40 pounders with fewer reps. When I first bought the 40 Lb dbs I could only do two reps for curls! :rofl: But it only took a week to start seeing progress. Usually I do 3 sets of 15 each with the 20s, and 2 sets of 5-10 reps with the 40s, for about 6 or 8 different routines, and other cardio stuff as well. But I constantly add new stuff. It's all starting to come back to me now.
I've had a similar experience after years of desk sitting.

I started with 15 and 25 pound dumbells. Then got 40 pound.

I used a barbell with 100 or 120 or 150 lbs, excluding the bar.


For an interesting exercise, I'll take the dumbbells in hand and walk two or more miles.


Back when I was an iron worker, hefting 100 lbs in each arm was no big deal. I preferred to move big beams by myself.

My military was about 240 lbs (I used to toss it as high as I could then catch it), about 300 # on bench, and curling about 180#.
 
  • #27
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I'm a college wrestler and the best way to build a good foundation is the spartan workout. Just do 10 exercises 15 reps each 3 times. You can find details on YouTube. After 30 days move to the gym and focus on free weights. You want a controlled strain when your lifting. Build muscle endurance before going hard on free weights. Then alternate programs every 30 days to trick muscles.
 
  • #28
Ivan Seeking
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My military was about 240 lbs (I used to toss it as high as I could then catch it), about 300 # on bench, and curling about 180#.
So we were pretty close except for the bench press. For some reason that was always my weakest lift. I don't remember my max but I know I never hit 300. In fact I think I my max military lift was about the same as my max bench.

But I could crank away on the 750 pound pedal on the weight machine longer than anyone else on our hs football team. :biggrin:

Does anyone care to explain muscle confusion? I keep meaning to look into this. I assume the standard alternation between light and heavy was doing the same thing before we talked about muscle confusion?
 
  • #29
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So we were pretty close except for the bench press. For some reason that was always my weakest lift. I don't remember my max but I know I never hit 300. In fact I think I my max military lift was about the same as my max bench.

But I could crank away on the 750 pound pedal on the weight machine longer than anyone else on our hs football team. :biggrin:

Does anyone care to explain muscle confusion? I keep meaning to look into this. I assume the standard alternation between light and heavy was doing the same thing before we talked about muscle confusion?
It's just training in intervals always switching up types of workouts.
 
  • #30
Ivan Seeking
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It's just training in intervals always switching up types of workouts.
But what is the physiology behind this idea? I tended to assume that it refers to the different muscle fiber types all getting exercised.
 
  • #31
Mentalist
A friend sent this to me years ago (we did Shorinji Kempo together blended with Shaolin Kungfu):

Bruce Lee: Bruce Lee is possibly the best example of a slim body pushed to its fullest potential. The late martial artist remains a role model to many short, skinny guys around the world. Gyms have pictures and posters of the "legend" plastered on their walls, and for good reason: not all men can be big, beefy studs. Bruce Lee experimented with different routines and this one fit his style best.

Shoulders: Clean and presses: 2 sets, 8 reps

Lats: Barbell pullovers: 2 sets, 8 reps

Biceps: Barbell curls: 2 sets, 8 reps

Chest: Bench-presses: 2 sets, 6 reps

Lower Back/Glutes/Hamstrings: Good mornings: 2 sets, 8 reps

Quads: Squats: 2 sets, 12 reps

Abs:
• Waist Twists: 4 sets, 90 repetitions
• Sit up Twist: 4 sets, 20 repetitions
• Leg Raises: 4 sets, 20 repetitions
• Leaning Twist: 4 sets, 50 repetitions

Bruce Lee's training emphasized toning and compound exercises rather than concentration and mass. Bodybuilding played only a small part in his physical conditioning, with stretching and aerobics taking up the rest of his exercise cycle. He would perform this weight-lifting routine every other day.

As far as I know, Lee used weights compatible with his own body mass, and the push or lift was fast.


He used pullups (lats) and push ups. Try pushing onself to a vertical position!

OK - try pushing oneself up and clapping the hands - behind the back - twice.

Then try one arm push ups.

Also - do handstand pushups.

A human being should be able lift his or her own weight - and actually - 1.5x his or her own weight. Chimpanzees can handle two to three times their weight, which allows the to move in the trees.
The intensity of such an exercise does not seem right when concerning humans. Yes, we should be lean and able to lift our own bodyweight, however, that is a given when concerning moderate rates of exercise and proper nutrition.
 
  • #32
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well this is good timing

Here are ten keys to strength training success. See how many of them you apply in your own training!

1. When you start a new program, break into it easily. You don’t need to go full steam from day one. Build up gradually.

1a. The same applies if you add a new exercise to your program.

2. Be consistent. Never miss a workout. Every time you miss a workout you take two steps backward.

3. Emphasize heavy leg and back training. Leg and back training is the key to strength, power and muscle.

4. When I say to “train heavy,” I obviously mean to train heavy for your current level of development. That may mean 100 pounds in the squat for one lifter, 200 pounds for another lifter, and 300 pounds for a third lifter. For some lifters, it may mean 400 or 500 pounds.

5. Add weight to the bar whenever possible. The name of the game is progressive weight training.

6. When you add weight to the bar, add small amounts. Over time, the small increases add up to BIG GAINS.

7. Most trainees do too many exercises, too many sets, and too many reps – and they train too often. It isn’t until they streamline their workouts and focus on QUALITY TRAINING that they finally begin to make gains.

7a. Quality Training is Tommy Kono’s term for what I call abbreviated training. He won two Olympic gold medals and one silver medal with Quality Training.

7b. Quality Training means you choose a small number of productive exercises, train them hard, and then stop for the day.

8. Norb Schemansky won medals in FOUR different Olympics (1948, 1952, 1960 and 1964) – an amazing competition record. He once said, “If you can’t get it done in 45 minutes, it ain’t gonna happen.”

9. Divided workouts are great. A divided workout lets you focus your efforts on one, two or three exercises in each workout, and give them your all.

9a. REST one or two days between workouts, even if you are using a divided workout program.

9b. Your muscles grow when you are resting, not when you are training.

10. For many trainees, ultra-abbreviated training programs are the key to success.

There you have it – ten keys to strength training success! Read, them, remember them, and apply them!

As always, thanks for reading, and have a great day – and a great weekend. If you train today, make it a good one!
http://dinosaurtraining.blogspot.ca/2013/04/10-keys-to-strength-training-success.html
 
  • #33
Ivan Seeking
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Excellent! It seems that I've been doing this all correctly except for adding too much weight at once, perhaps. But that is more because I've been hesitating to buy more equipment until I'm sure how I wish to proceed.

When I was ten years old, my uncle gave me a book called simply "Self Defense", IIRC, and it covered everything from weight training to the basics in various forms of martial arts. I proceeded to buy my first weight set [my first real purchase in life] and used that book like a bible. Over the years I have never found a better guide. I don't think I've ever run across a bad piece of information from that training. I know I still have that book in a box somewhere...
 
  • #34
Ivan Seeking
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Beyond a doubt, my last two workouts were the hardest I've had since I was in my early twenties. I think I need to take a couple of extra days off... two days later I am still tired and sore. I suspect I got a bit of the runners high and pushed a little too hard the last time.
 
  • #35
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Beyond a doubt, my last two workouts were the hardest I've had since I was in my early twenties. I think I need to take a couple of extra days off... two days later I am still tired and sore. I suspect I got a bit of the runners high and pushed a little too hard the last time.
Are you getting adequate carb intake right after the workouts?
 
  • #36
Ivan Seeking
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Are you getting adequate carb intake right after the workouts?
Yes... with the qualifier that while I have tried to compensate, I don't know how much more to eat now! I know my appetite has been crazy the last few days so I've tried to feed the beast what it wants.

Almost all of my carbs for the day are typically consumed just before and after a workout.
 
  • #37
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Yes... with the qualifier that while I have tried to compensate, I don't know how much more to eat now! I know my appetite has been crazy the last few days so I've tried to feed the beast what it wants.

Almost all of my carbs for the day are typically consumed just before and after a workout.
I used to work out and I read websites that explain the best things to consume after a workout, and I was surprised at how much sugar they would say to consume after a workout. It was like 2 scoops of protein powder, and double that much sugar (like dextrose or maltodextrin). I felt bad using that much, so I just used one scoop of protein and one scoop of dextrose. I honestly couldn't tell if it made a difference, but that's what all the weight lifters do.

And yeah, whenever I was working out, it seemed like I could constantly eat all day. I don't know how body builders with such huge amounts of muscle eat enough to be satisfied.
I've heard of some strongmen who talk about their diets and some of them are crazy. One guy eats a bunch of meals a day, and with each meal he says he's eating chocolate. Then he says he even wakes up in the middle of the night to eat more chocolate.
 
  • #38
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Beyond a doubt, my last two workouts were the hardest I've had since I was in my early twenties. I think I need to take a couple of extra days off... two days later I am still tired and sore. I suspect I got a bit of the runners high and pushed a little too hard the last time.
same sort of thing happened to me on last friday & monday. I still worked out this week on the days I was supposed to. I just knew ahead of time that I would likely have to tke it easy, not being recovered 100% from before. One workout I hit what should be a good monthly goal (a nice round number), & the other I missed by 5lbs. I'm pretty sure I can still get it before the end of the month.
 
  • #39
lisab
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Definitely want to ease in. Don't lift for performance in the beginning. You'll just end up hurting yourself. Do more low weight reps to help condition the muscles. Otherwise you'll end up with DOMS and be out a couple weeks. Try to lift during off hours if you feel uncomfortable. It is a great idea to combine lifting and cardio. Don't just be a meat head. Be able to run some miles too :)
What's the difference between DOMS and just being sore? I always thought being a bit sore the next day was a good thing, it means I'm making progress.
 
  • #40
Ivan Seeking
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It was like 2 scoops of protein powder, and double that much sugar (like dextrose or maltodextrin).
With my blood sugar problems, that could and probably would land me in the hospital!
 
  • #41
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Physics_UG,

Are you holding yourself accountable to your workout program?

Gloves or no gloves is another thing to keep in mind. I find I get a more solid connection with my form without gloves. However, I do like having soft hands for tickling my son, so I alternate when I wear them.

What an excellent day for a jog.
 
  • #42
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looks like the best thing post-workout is whey protein & maybe moderate carbs of some sort. one reason carbs are recommended is that they cause an increase in insulin secretion, but whey protein does the same thing & also is a source of the right kinds of amino acids, especially leucine, to support protein synthesis

http://www.charlespoliquin.com/Blog...ion-Don-t-Let-Your-Hard-Work-Go-to-Waste.aspx
http://www.charlespoliquin.com/Blog...ut-Nutrition-Don-t-Negate-Your-Hard-Work.aspx
http://www.charlespoliquin.com/Blog...rkout-Nutrition-Tips-Are-Carbs-Essential.aspx
http://www.charlespoliquin.com/Blog...ion-Tips-for-Fat-Loss-Muscle-Development.aspx
 
  • #43
Ivan Seeking
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looks like the best thing post-workout is whey protein & maybe moderate carbs of some sort. one reason carbs are recommended is that they cause an increase in insulin secretion, but whey protein does the same thing & also is a source of the right kinds of amino acids, especially leucine, to support protein synthesis

http://www.charlespoliquin.com/Blog...ion-Don-t-Let-Your-Hard-Work-Go-to-Waste.aspx
http://www.charlespoliquin.com/Blog...ut-Nutrition-Don-t-Negate-Your-Hard-Work.aspx
http://www.charlespoliquin.com/Blog...rkout-Nutrition-Tips-Are-Carbs-Essential.aspx
http://www.charlespoliquin.com/Blog...ion-Tips-for-Fat-Loss-Muscle-Development.aspx
Excellent! I can do that! I normally have 60 grams of whey protein first thing each day, but I can add some and time things a bit differently now.

One thing that I had never considered is the connection between amino acids and heart and vascular health. In addition to the fact that the heart is a muscle that benefits from a "muscle-building" diet and regime, as do all muscles, there is quite a bit suggesting there are other benefits as well.

According to the study in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology:

"... [L]arge artery elasticity index (LAEI) ... was significantly greater in patients treated with L-arginine than in the placebo group ... Systemic vascular resistance was significantly lower in patients treated with L-arginine ...

This improvement was associated with a decrease in systolic blood pressure, peripheral vascular resistance as well as a decrease in aldosterone levels."
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/a...pressure-and-cardiovascular-risk-factors.aspx

Abstract

In humans, taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is mainly obtained from diet. Despite the fact that the health effects of taurine are largely unknown, taurine has become a popular supplement and ingredient in energy drinks in recent years. Evidence from mechanistic and animal studies has shown that the main biological actions of taurine include its ability to conjugate bile acids, regulate blood pressure (BP), and act as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. These actions suggest that high levels of taurine may be protective against coronary heart disease (CHD)...
http://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(09)00432-8/abstract

Conclusions— Dietary glutamic acid may have independent BP-lowering effects, which may contribute to the inverse relation of vegetable protein to BP.
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/120/3/221.short
 
Last edited:
  • #44
Benko
Out of curiosity are you looking to bulk or cut?
 
  • #45
Benko
I'm just going to guess considering what you wrote in your original post. If you are looking to cut (lose weight and define muscle), focus on compound exercises - http://www.muscleandstrength.com/workouts/21-compound-exercises-only-workout.html for example. Following this try to put in 20 min of light cardio to keep the oxygen flowing into your trained muscle groups. But the most important aspect to lifting is your diet. If you keep all this in check, emphasis on the diet, you should see results within a very small time frame.

My info:
- 71kg
- Deadlift 120kg
- Currently workout of following http://www.madbarz.com/ for cutting cycle.
 
  • #46
Ivan Seeking
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Does anyone else ever feel a slight chill several hours after a particularly hard workout? I've noticed this a few times since increasing my routine. I feel a very slight chill at times up to the next day. I wonder if I'm not getting enough calories to compensate for the extra energy output.
 

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