Anyone want to study Physics at Oxford or Cambridge Universities (UK)?

In summary, the conversation discusses studying physics at Oxford or Cambridge and the advantages and disadvantages of attending these universities. The poster expresses a preference for staying at a different university and studying abroad for graduate school. The conversation also touches on the reputation and quality of teaching at Oxbridge, as well as the social and financial aspects of student life at these universities.
  • #1
-Gav-
1
0
I guess the title of the thread sums up what I'm asking. Anyone wanting to study Physics at Oxford or Cambridge? :smile:
 
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  • #2
No, I'd much rather stay here and attend a crappy university.

Why do you ask?

PL
 
  • #3
Of course =)
 
  • #4
Which semester? what level physics? study abroad? details. :)
 
  • #5
I would personally rather not, because they do natural sciences instead of just pure physics, which means you have to do all three sciences even if you don't want to.
 
  • #6
Bladibla said:
I would personally rather not, because they do natural sciences instead of just pure physics, which means you have to do all three sciences even if you don't want to.

That'd be Cambridge. You don't have to do all three at all, you study 'natural sciences' but choose which type of science you study. My girlfriend is doing 'natural sciences' at Cambridge, specialising in medical and veterinary science. She's not had a single physics lecture there, not even in first year.

Oxford offers straight physics.
 
  • #7
brewnog said:
That'd be Cambridge. You don't have to do all three at all, you study 'natural sciences' but choose which type of science you study. My girlfriend is doing 'natural sciences' at Cambridge, specialising in medical and veterinary science. She's not had a single physics lecture there, not even in first year.

Oxford offers straight physics.

Ah..is that true? Still.. something about oxbridge just ticks me off a bit. I would rather go to another university in europe such as trinity (dublin) THEN go to other universities for post-graduate degrees.
 
  • #8
Bladibla said:
Ah..is that true? Still.. something about oxbridge just ticks me off a bit. I would rather go to another university in europe such as trinity (dublin) THEN go to other universities for post-graduate degrees.


Yeah definitely. In many cases, the course content and quality of teaching at the Oxbridge universities compare extremely badly to a lot of other UK (and European, I suppose) universities. The student life is poor at Oxbridge too, in most respects.

The distinct advantage of an Oxbridge degree is reputation, but many employers now see past this and prefer graduates from universities which excel in whatever field they're recruiting into.
 
  • #9
That's my dream...at least for graduate school...I'd love to get out of the U.S.! Repeating what others have written: Why do you ask?
 
  • #10
brewnog said:
Yeah definitely. In many cases, the course content and quality of teaching at the Oxbridge universities compare extremely badly to a lot of other UK (and European, I suppose) universities. The student life is poor at Oxbridge too, in most respects.

The distinct advantage of an Oxbridge degree is reputation, but many employers now see past this and prefer graduates from universities which excel in whatever field they're recruiting into.

Student life poor at oxbridge..? That's the first time i hear that. :bugeye:

If you don't mind asking, why is it like that?
 
  • #11
Bladibla said:
Student life poor at oxbridge..? That's the first time i hear that. :bugeye:

If you don't mind asking, why is it like that?


Well, obviously people tend to have a good time wherever they go.

However, all of my Oxbridge friends (without exception) complain that there are no good nightclubs, going out is incredibly expensive (beer at £3.50 per pint is common), and the sports clubs are extremely exclusive, cliquey and competitive. At many colleges, you have to buy all your food off the college at inflated prices, even if you don't want to eat it there every night. The accomodation prices are extortionate, and the public-school (yanks read private school) atmosphere is very unfriendly, and often quite condescending to state school students.
 
  • #12
brewnog said:
Well, obviously people tend to have a good time wherever they go.

However, all of my Oxbridge friends (without exception) complain that there are no good nightclubs, going out is incredibly expensive (beer at £3.50 per pint is common), and the sports clubs are extremely exclusive, cliquey and competitive. At many colleges, you have to buy all your food off the college at inflated prices, even if you don't want to eat it there every night. The accomodation prices are extortionate, and the public-school (yanks read private school) atmosphere is very unfriendly, and often quite condescending to state school students.

I see.. however, wouldn't it still be good for people who wants only education there?

What about the teaching qualities there? Why is it so bad?

Mind you, this is just for curiosity :biggrin:
 
  • #13
I'm not saying the teaching quality is terrible at the Oxbridge universities, just that it's not all what it's cracked up to be. It used to be the case that Oxbridge had the best lecturers and teaching staff in the world, which is partly what made them good universities and earned them their reputation. Now, however, while the quality of teaching is still good, it's only comparable to other good universities. In terms of education, you may as well be at any of the British 'Red Brick' universities as Oxbridge. The advantage of Oxbridge is not the education you receive, but having the university's name on your degree certificate.
 
  • #14
I've been trying hard to get an extension to my stay in grad school so I can go to Cambridge for a year and study part III maths, but it doesn't look like we're going to be able to work out a deal in time.
 

1. What are the entry requirements for studying Physics at Oxford or Cambridge Universities in the UK?

The entry requirements for Physics at Oxford and Cambridge Universities are quite competitive. Both universities require students to have excellent grades in A-levels or equivalent qualifications in subjects such as Physics, Mathematics, and Further Mathematics. They also look for strong academic references and a personal statement that demonstrates a passion for the subject. Additionally, students may be required to take admissions tests such as the Physics Aptitude Test (PAT) for Oxford or the Cambridge Assessment Admissions Test (CAT) for Cambridge.

2. How long does it take to complete a Physics degree at Oxford or Cambridge Universities in the UK?

Typically, a Physics degree at Oxford or Cambridge Universities takes three to four years to complete. However, some courses may offer a year abroad or a year in industry, which can extend the duration of the degree.

3. What is the difference between studying Physics at Oxford and Cambridge Universities in the UK?

Both Oxford and Cambridge Universities have excellent Physics departments and offer similar courses. However, there are some differences in the teaching and learning styles, as well as the research focus of each university. Oxford tends to have a more theoretical and mathematical approach, while Cambridge places a stronger emphasis on experimental work. It is recommended to research the specific course content and teaching methods of each university to determine which may be a better fit for you.

4. Can international students study Physics at Oxford or Cambridge Universities in the UK?

Yes, both Oxford and Cambridge Universities welcome international students to study Physics. However, international students may have additional requirements, such as demonstrating proficiency in English language and obtaining a student visa. It is best to check with the university's international admissions office for specific requirements.

5. What career opportunities are available for graduates of Physics at Oxford or Cambridge Universities in the UK?

A degree in Physics from Oxford or Cambridge Universities opens up a wide range of career opportunities. Graduates often go on to pursue careers in research, engineering, finance, technology, and many other fields. Many also choose to continue their studies and pursue postgraduate degrees in Physics or related fields. The strong reputation and prestigious name of these universities can also greatly enhance career prospects.

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