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Ap Physics

  1. Jun 27, 2006 #1
    Does anyone know a good site and/or book on ap physics? I'm taking it next year (senior year high shcool....) and i wanted to see what new material we'd be covering and maybe do a little reading. Thanks in Advance
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 27, 2006 #2
    A great book for AP Physics is "Physics: Principles with Applications" Fifth or Sixth Edition. by Douglas C. Giancoli, University of California, Berkeley

    The book's website is here:

    http://wps.prenhall.com/esm_giancoli_physicsppa_6

    You may be able to get it used through an online bookseller, or borrow it from your library.

    Don't just jump to the math and try problem solving. Actually read through the chapters, slowly, following the history of the subject, and the logic of the ideas. Only then should you look at the example problems, and see if you can follow how they are done. After that you can try your hand at the end of chapter problems.

    The official AP Physics website states:

    The following textbooks are commonly used in colleges and typify the level of the B course. However, the inclusion of a text does NOT constitute endorsement by the College Board, ETS, or the AP Physics Development Committee. Students should consult their teachers before using any of these review books.

    * Cutnell, John D., and Kenneth W. Johnson. 2004. Physics, 6th ed. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.

    * Giancoli, Douglas C. 2005. Physics: Principles with Applications, 6th ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall.

    * Hecht, Eugene. 2003. Physics: Algebra/Trigonometry, 3rd ed. Pacific Grove, Calif.: Brooks/Cole Publishing.

    * Serway, Raymond A., and Jerry S. Faughn. 2003. College Physics, 6th ed. Pacific Grove, Calif.: Brooks/Cole Publishing.

    * Wilson, Jerry D., and Anthony J. Buffa. 2003. College Physics, 5th ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall.

    http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/sub_physb.html?physicsb

    However, this is assuming that you are taking AP Physics B, the usual course, which is advanced, but has no calculus. If you choose to take AP Physics C, this course is the same, but with a number of challenging problems that require high-school level calculus to solve.

    The official AP Physics C webiste states:

    This course ordinarily forms the first part of the college sequence that serves as the foundation in physics for students majoring in the physical sciences or engineering. The sequence is parallel to or preceded by mathematics courses that include calculus. Methods of calculus are used wherever appropriate in formulating physical principles and in applying them to physical problems. The sequence is more intensive and analytic than that in the B course. Strong emphasis is placed on solving a variety of challenging problems, some requiring calculus. The subject matter of the C course is principally mechanics and electricity and magnetism, with approximately equal emphasis on these two areas. The C course is the first part of a sequence which in college is sometimes a very intensive one-year course but often extends over one and one-half to two years, with a laboratory component.

    The following textbooks are commonly used in colleges and typify the level of the C course. However, the inclusion of a text does NOT constitute endorsement by the College Board, ETS, or the AP Physics Development Committee. Students should consult their teachers before using any of these review books.

    * Chabay, Ruth W., and Bruce A. Sherwood. 2003. Matter & Interaction II: Electric & Magnetic Interactions, Version 1.2. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.

    * Fishbane, Paul M., Stephen Gasiorowicz, and Stephen T. Thornton. 2005. Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall.

    * Giancoli, Douglas C. 2000. Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 3rd ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall.

    * Halliday, David, Robert Resnick, and Jearl Walke. 2005. Fundamentals of Physics, 7th ed. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.

    * Halliday, David, Robert Resnick, and Kenneth Krane. 2001. Physics, Parts I and II, 5th ed. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.

    * Knight, Randall D. 2004. Physics for Scientists and Engineers: A Strategic Approach with Modern Physics. Boston: Addison-Wesley.

    * Serway, Raymond A., Robert J. Beichner and John J. Jewett. 2000. Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 5th ed. Pacific Grove, Calif.: Brooks/Cole Publishing.

    * Serway, Raymond A. and John W. Jewett. 2002. Principles of Physics, 3rd ed. Pacific Grove, Calif.: Brooks/Cole Publishing.

    * Tipler, Paul A. and Gene P. Mosca. 2004. Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 5th ed. New York: W.H. Freeman.

    * Wolfson, Richard, and Jay M. Pasachoff. 1999. Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 3rd ed. Boston: Addison-Wesley.

    * Young, Hugh D. and Roger A. Freedman. 2004. University Physics, 11th ed. Boston: Addison-Wesley.


    http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/sub_physc.html?physicsc

    Have fun. These are great books, and its a great course!


    Robert

    Robert
     
  4. Jun 27, 2006 #3
    Hi, I took AP Physics B and AP Physics C Mechanics. For C Mechanics (or electricity and magnetism) I personally found the book by Halliday, Walker, and Resnick to be an excellent text with good problems.
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/04...441485/ref=sr_1_1/104-4899035-3969555?ie=UTF8

    If you're planning on also taking the AP Exam at the end of the year, I advise also getting a review book. The book that is most similar to the exam, in my opinion, is the Princeton Review AP Physics B and C practice book.
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/03...441544/ref=sr_1_1/104-4899035-3969555?ie=UTF8

    Good luck!
     
  5. Jun 27, 2006 #4
  6. Jun 29, 2006 #5
    If you're taking AP Physics B, I recommend Shaums Guide to College Physics (or something along that line).

    Paden Roder
     
  7. Jul 2, 2006 #6
    I second that; Fundamentals of Physics should cover everything you need for whichever exam you're aiming for.
     
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