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Apocaholics Anonymous

  1. May 22, 2007 #1
    Fight the fear of the future, the disaster addiction, and join

    Apocaholics Anonymous

     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 22, 2007 #2

    Ivan Seeking

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    Funny thing about Y2K: One or some of the fixes used to correct some military computers caused part of our defenses to go blind, leaving us completely vulnerable to a nuclear missile attack. IIRC, the systems were offline for about 7 hours.

    The real lesson with Y2K is that we can anticipate problems and act accordingly to either prevent disasters, or at least to minimize the damage. Had we done nothing to prepare it surely would have been at least a financial disaster.

    Another example is the cold war. It took the best efforts of many brilliant men and women to prevent an inadvertant escalation of events that could have easily led to nuclear war.

    We can only address the problems that we are willing to confront. Hiding and living in denial never solved any problem.

    Despair and denial are the real enemies; the rest is just a problem to be solved.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2007
  4. May 22, 2007 #3
    They arent built in a redundant way?:eek::eek:
     
  5. May 22, 2007 #4

    Ivan Seeking

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    Redundant systems may have had the same problem...? I only know that this was made public a few years ago, and for a time, to some extent we were blind to attack. I keep thinking that this applied to the West Coast of the US.

    But who needs redundant systems anyway? That's just fear mongering. :biggrin:
     
  6. May 24, 2007 #5
    Yeah, so you patch one, leaving the other as is. The when the all clear is given on the recently patched system, patch the other. Thus you never have a blackhole in your service :smile:

    Doesnt the Military use a decent Change Management System? hehe
     
  7. May 24, 2007 #6

    Ivan Seeking

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    This appears to be the same incident, but the report that I heard indicated that this was only made public later, so I'm not 100% sure about this.

    http://archives.cnn.com/2000/US/01/01/y2k.wrap/

    So may be that the delay was the time needed to bring back-up systems online.

    ...oh, I bet that it was the seriousness of the situation that was made public later.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2007
  8. Jun 4, 2007 #7
  9. Jun 4, 2007 #8

    mheslep

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    ... overreact and waste colossal sums, thereby diverting resources from ongoing problems.
     
  10. Jun 4, 2007 #9

    Office_Shredder

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    In Connecticut, the DMVs couldn't register new cars, because the computer system insisted all models after 1900 weren't built yet.

    (Go figure out WHY they would have the computer check the model's year against the current year :rolleyes: )

    But the point is, an error like that can grind the economy to a halt!
     
  11. Jun 5, 2007 #10

    mheslep

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    Id say the point is errors like that did and do occur from time to time and the economy did not, gasp, grind to a halt. People deal.
     
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