Applied force needed on a ramp

In summary, the table shows that the applied force needed to push a 10-kg box up a ramp as the angle increases is 19 N at 10 degrees, 30 N at 20 degrees, 40 N at 30 degrees, and 49 N at 40 degrees.
  • #1

Homework Statement


The table (below) shows the force needed to push a 10-kg box up a ramp as the angles increase. From the trend in the table, what is the applied force needed if the angle of the ramp increases to 50 degrees?

Applied Force (N) ; Ramp Angle (Degrees)
19N ; 10 degrees
30N ; 20 degrees
40N ; 30 degrees
49N ; 40 degrees

Homework Equations



applied force = mg sin(degree of angle)


The Attempt at a Solution



I honestly don't know about this, and I'm not really looking for the answer to the problem, just the "how-to". I tried, with the equation above, to see if it worked for the 19N ; 10 degrees (in the table). My work looked like:

applied force = (10kg)(9.81)sin(10) = 17.0348...

This obviously isn't the 19N that I was supposed to get. I can't find any decent explanations for this problem, and would appreciate any help.
 
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  • #2
Well, there could be friction acting, but something is wrong with the problem data. For example, when theta = 30 degrees, then you need at least 50 N to get it to move, but the table indicates 40 N.
 
  • #3
PhanthomJay said:
Well, there could be friction acting, but something is wrong with the problem data.

Alright well, that was all the info I was given for the problem, so in that case I'm assuming my teacher transposed the numbers or something? Other than that, was I at least correct in what formula to use in that type of problem, and in the execution? Its just that I really don't know how to do this, and would at least like to know if I was going about it the right way, even if the data provided is wrong.
 
  • #4
I agree, there seems to be something wrong with the problem statement.

If you are sure there is no friction then you have exactly the right setup and you know the data is off, but even if you try to account for friction the numbers given produce a coefficient of kinetic friction that is not constant.

With friction,

[tex]F_{push}[/tex] = [tex]f_{k}[/tex] + [tex]F_{g}[/tex]Sin([tex]\theta[/tex])

So that extra friction force can be set up to give you the 19 N. at 10 degrees, but then the rest of the data needs a different coefficient of friction to produce the stated forces. If the data were correct, the coefficient should stay constant and allow you to predict the force needed at 50 degrees.

That's all I got.
 

1. How is the applied force calculated on a ramp?

The applied force on a ramp can be calculated using the formula: Force = mass * acceleration. The mass refers to the object being moved on the ramp, and the acceleration is the rate at which the object's velocity changes.

2. What factors affect the amount of applied force needed on a ramp?

The amount of applied force needed on a ramp is affected by several factors such as the weight of the object, the angle of the ramp, and the coefficient of friction between the object and the surface of the ramp. These factors determine the amount of resistance the object will face while moving on the ramp.

3. How does the angle of a ramp affect the applied force needed?

The angle of a ramp plays a significant role in determining the amount of applied force needed. As the angle of the ramp increases, the force required to move an object up the ramp also increases. This is because a steeper angle increases the weight component acting against the direction of motion, making it harder for the object to move.

4. What is the relationship between the coefficient of friction and applied force on a ramp?

The coefficient of friction is a measure of the resistance between two surfaces in contact. On a ramp, a higher coefficient of friction between the object and the ramp's surface results in a greater amount of applied force needed to move the object up the ramp. This is because a higher coefficient of friction means there is more resistance to the object's motion.

5. How can the applied force on a ramp be reduced?

The applied force on a ramp can be reduced by decreasing the weight of the object, using a shallower angle for the ramp, or increasing the coefficient of friction between the object and the ramp's surface. Additionally, using tools such as pulleys or levers can also help reduce the amount of applied force needed to move an object on a ramp.

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