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Applied Math + Theo. Physics major

  1. Aug 9, 2005 #1
    Hi everyone!
    I've been pondering about what i want to do for the rest of my life for a really really long time now, and i still have no idea!
    i'm currently pursuing a specialization in applied math (just finished 2nd yr) , but i'm leaning towards doing a double major in applied math and theoretical physics. However, i just am not sure! i like applied math and physics, but i like pure math as well. Plus, i thiink it's better to get a specialization in one area rather than just majors in two areas since i plan to get a ph.D (although im not sure in what area yet). for a while i was thinking of switching my major to pure math, but that feels risky because the only pure math course i've taken is calculus 1 & 2, and althogh i've enjoyed them, calculus isn't a 100% "Pure math".
    So basically my questions are:
    1. is it possible to get into grad school with only a major in that area? (ex. will i need to learn some stuff on my own to write the GRE?)
    2. if i decide that i don't want to get a ph.D, what jobs are out there for a doublemajorer in Applied Math and Theo. Physics?
    3. Is doing a specialization in Applied Math a good idea? (because it seems that most of my applied math profs don't even have a degree in applied math, but in physics, engineering, etc. ie. it seems like the stuff you learn in applied math can be easily learned in physics, so why not just major in physcis instead?)
    4. what is the job market like for pure math majors? and is it hard to get into pure math grad studies?

    sorry for the long post, and i really appreciate your time!
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 9, 2005 #2
    2 & 4. Teaching is one. Depending on how far you go will determine what level you will most likely be teaching at.
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