1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Applied physics degree?

  1. Jan 1, 2016 #1
    Is this basically engineering physics? Is this a good idea for someone who loves the concepts of physics but wants a good chance in the job market? Thank you
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 2, 2016 #2

    Student100

    User Avatar
    Education Advisor
    Gold Member

    It depends on the school (I'm assuming you're talking about a BS), if it's called applied physics instead of engineering physics it's likely it isn't ABET accredited. This can be good and bad, depending on what you want to do with the degree. You'll have more leeway in the degree, it may be offered by the physics department instead of the engineering department, and other such things. It does, however, mean you won't have that "engineering" keyword in the degree.

    What school are you looking at? EP and AP degrees vary so much between institutions and content it's hard to judge without that context. The most that could be assumed is that an AP degree should be good preparation for an AP graduate program.
     
  4. Jan 2, 2016 #3
    NYU, their applied physics bachelors and masters program is apart of their engineering school.
     
  5. Jan 2, 2016 #4

    Student100

    User Avatar
    Education Advisor
    Gold Member

    So after looking at the required courses for the major, it's more like a physics degree than an engineering degree.

    You get 26 technical electives, 12 free electives, and it also includes a senior project. If you used those 26 electives for math and physics (I would add a course in ODE or PDE's in there, beyond the linear + diff equation class), and one other math, and then took 4 additional upper division classes in physics, you basically have a physics degree. You could then use those 12 for projects/engineering classes if you wanted.

    To answer your original question:

    If you plan on getting a terminal bachelors degree, this degree isn't going to help you land a job more readily than just majoring in engineering.
     
  6. Jan 2, 2016 #5
    I definitely will pursue higher than a bachelors degree so masters at least. So my original plan if I get in there was to the their 3-2 program with physics and some form of engineering and then do a masters in applied physics , how does that sound? I'm not really sure what jobs I can get with an applied physics masters. Thank you for replying by the way!
     
  7. Jan 2, 2016 #6

    Student100

    User Avatar
    Education Advisor
    Gold Member

    Why AP rather than engineering?
     
  8. Jan 2, 2016 #7
    The engineering that they offer in the 3-2 program doesn't seem to interest me as much as just physics . They offer civil, electrical, mechanical and computer . I put on my application the computer one just because it's like one of the best jobs but I'm not big into computers . Plus I thought an applied degree would save me the extra year.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook