Applied theoretical physics

  • Thread starter r.clark
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  • #26
eri
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MIT has a physics major. It does not expect you to decide if you want to do applied or theoretical physics; you just learn physics. You'd make the distinction at the graduate level, if you get that far. Most of the research you'd do as an undergrad would be on the applied side, since there's not much you can do in the way of theory without extensive coursework, math, and time spent learning about the field through the journals.
 
  • #27
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Initial question = possible (X). Substance of conversation became (-X). To much (-X) and (X) is lost.

Solution: For every question you have answered with a negative response, count them up and give a positive response for each question. (Maybe something like, Hey Kid! Here are 5 really good things you can try that might help you get into MIT.)

This should get you back to your Initial Question. I am sorry it got lost. :(

btw... (-X) is never productive, its actually quite the opposite. :) Cheers
I have to say you do have great posts.
 
  • #28
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Naa it doesn't. You don't really specialize until graduate school, so you have at least 4 years to get a feel for which path you want to take. Everyone who gets their bachelors simply gets it in Physics.
True, thank you've been a huge help. I appreciate it.
 
  • #29
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MIT has a physics major. It does not expect you to decide if you want to do applied or theoretical physics; you just learn physics. You'd make the distinction at the graduate level, if you get that far. Most of the research you'd do as an undergrad would be on the applied side, since there's not much you can do in the way of theory without extensive coursework, math, and time spent learning about the field through the journals.
Thanks for the info.
 
  • #30
757
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Hey can I ask you a question? Why did you say you want to do mechanical engineering? I'm about to finish that major and it feels like special ed. and has zero overlap with medium/high-end mathematics and physics. I'm not at MIT but even their program can't be too much better, a few notches higher, yes, but I don't think its enough.

If you are rich just do a double major in pure mathematics and physics, that's all you need to know.
 
  • #31
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Hey can I ask you a question? Why did you say you want to do mechanical engineering? I'm about to finish that major and it feels like special ed. and has zero overlap with medium/high-end mathematics and physics. I'm not at MIT but even their program can't be too much better, a few notches higher, yes, but I don't think its enough.

If you are rich just do a double major in pure mathematics and physics, that's all you need to know.
Well i am not rich i just have two interests i've been doing ME programs since i was in 8th grade and i love it but i also love the deeper topics in physics. As far as money is concerned since i live in boston and my family both parents combined at the moment make less that 20,000 a year school like harvard and M.I.T will give you big scholarships.
p.s can someone please tell me anything about engineering physics i saw it while i was looking at physics majors does EP go as deep in physics as applied and theoretical?
 
  • #32
757
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Hey from my experience no engineering really goes deep. I learned that if you want learn something, you gotta do it on your own. The whole point of Universities is for them to make money, nothing else. It's just like any other business. They don't care if you learn as long as they make their money. When you are in high school teachers/counselors makes it seem like everyone would just love for you to go to the best school and become successful. In reality, nobody gives a turd, you'll learn it sooner or later.

So if you are a poor kid with talent and just an interest in deeper physics, welcome to the club; you gotta teach yourself off some good books. Its the best way to learn anyways. Private Message me and I'll give you a list with some good books that are suitable for self-teaching.
 
  • #33
491
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I think maybe computational physics could be a sort of applied theoretical physics. You derive some equations, screw with the concepts, and then write programs to model some physical phenomena and see if it agrees with experimental data. It's sort of applied, in the sense that you're creating models.. it's a bit of a stretch, but maybe you'd be interested.
 
  • #34
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Hello

This is my first post and i was wondering is their a possible field know as applied theoretical physics? i am very interested in both applied physics and theoretical physics but i want them to be combined. this is taken in to consideration that in college i want to double major with one major being mechanical engineering. so i really wanted to know if this field existed.

Im at the end f my junior year of high school.

so this is very important.
I am agree with you ~~
 

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