Are blackholes

  • #1
benzun_1999
259
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blackholes and light.....

Dear Reader,
are black holes capable of attracting light?
-benzun
the more dimensions we know, the more we know.
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
selfAdjoint
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Yes. Light in the neighborhood of a black hole does odd things because of the gravitic attraction (= highly curved geodesics). I am sure some of our experts can give you links to anumations.
 
  • #3
meteor
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Hi,
In the framework of general relativity, mass is able to create a great distortion in spacetime, so spacetime around a BH will be very curved.
Photons have not mass, but they have energy, and in general relativity things with energy always follow the straightest way possible, that is called a geodesic. Near a black hole, the geodesic of a photon conducts to the black hole, so yes, photons will be attracted
 
  • #5
Phobos
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Welcome to Physics Forums, benzun_1999
 
  • #6
russ_watters
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meteor's explanation was good, but there is another implication here: since all mass warps space, all mass "attracts light"(not the wording I'd use, but it'll do). Black holes are not special in that regard.

For example, a photon passing by a star at a certain distance will have its path bent by the same amount as a photon passing by a black hole of the same mass at the same distance (measured from the center of each).
 
  • #7
benzun_1999
259
0
thanks...but...need more help

hi,
thank you phobos for inviting me. How does general relativity come hear. i am new to astronomy. i feel photons have relative mass.
-benzun
go easy on me
 
  • #8
Mentat
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Originally posted by benzun_1999
hi,
How does general relativity come hear?

I'm not sure I understand the question. Are you asking why General Relativity has something to do with your previous question? If so, it's because General Relativity is the theory that showed that gravity is just a warping or curvature of spacetime. Thus it is not that the BH attracts light, but rather that the light must follow the straightest path possible (path of least resistance), and must thus curve its path right along with the curve in spacetime.

Of course, the velocity of the object plays a role, which is why most things do not "trap" photons (since they are traveling very fast), but black holes are such a "steep" (for lack of a better word) curvature that even light cannot escape.
 

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