1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Area bounded by equations

  1. Jul 28, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    FInd the area bounded by x=-3, y=-x^2-2x, and y=x^2-4. (Hint: Graph the picture)

    2. The attempt at a solution
    My professor did set up the problem in class, but its throwing me off. He set it up as the lower bound -3 to 2, with the function (2x^2+2x-4)dx. I tried solving this but I keep getting a negative number. Any idea on what I am doing wrong?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 28, 2016 #2

    DrClaude

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Please give some details of your attempt at a solution.
     
  4. Jul 28, 2016 #3
    Ok, I end up with Area=2(-2^3/3)-2^2-4(-2)-(2(-3^3/3)+(-3)^2-4(-3) and I end with -5/3. I know the area cannot be negative. I have a feeling the upper bound is wrong or -x^2-2x should be the top curve. But my professor set it up exactly like this, and I just can't seem to solve it.
     
  5. Jul 28, 2016 #4

    DrClaude

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    First, be careful when you write the equation: I guess you mean (-2)^3, not -2^3, etc.

    Second, there is a problem with the signs in that equation for the area. How are you treating the part of the area that is below y = 0?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Area bounded by equations
  1. Area bounded by curves (Replies: 1)

Loading...