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Aerospace Ascension rate of balloon

  1. Jun 13, 2010 #1
    I have calculated that my gas balloon's ascension rate is 13.49031149 m/s^2 WITHOUT air friction.

    Ignore wind and let's say ground air density is 1.2 kg/m^3 at 20 °C.
    The shape of the balloon will be a cylinder with rounded ends. The top end will have a 4 meter diameter so the area of that is 12.5663706 m^2. The length or height will be 14.2916666 m.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2010
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 19, 2010 #2
    Where is the question?
     
  4. Jun 19, 2010 #3
    From an other thread, Imustthink wants to know how the rate of climb of his balloon is effected, from release, by including air drag. In essence, you release his inflated, or partially inflated balloon (he hasn't said which) ,and release it, how is its altitude a function of time?
     
  5. Jun 19, 2010 #4
    Phrak is correct and the balloon is Inflated.
     
  6. Jun 23, 2010 #5
    How do I find the ascension rate of a gas balloon when you factor in air drag?

    Its inflated Not partially inflated from release.

    I have calculated that my gas balloon's ascension rate is 13.49031149 m/s^2 from initial release WITHOUT air drag.

    Ignore wind and let's say ground air density is 1.2 kg/m^3 at 20 °C.
    The shape of the balloon will be a cylinder with rounded ends. The top end will have a 4 meter diameter so the area of that is 12.5663706 m^2. The length or height will be 14.2916666 m.
     
  7. Jun 25, 2010 #6

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    (two threads merged)
     
  8. Jun 25, 2010 #7

    Integral

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    Please learn some respect for measurements your post should read:

    "I have calculated that my gas balloon's ascension rate is 13.5 m/s^2 WITHOUT air friction.
    Ignore wind and let's say ground air density is 1.2 kg/m^3 at 20 °C.
    The shape of the balloon will be a cylinder with rounded ends. The top end will have a 4 meter diameter so the area of that is 12.6 m^2. The length or height will be 14.3 m"

    There is no way in the universe to measure the quantities concerned to accuracy you claim with all those useless digits. Please in future ignore all but the first 3 or 4 digits produced by your calculator, the rest are just noise and have no meaning.
     
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