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Astronomer and Inventor.

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

Hello, I'm a 5th grader from California, and I already know what I want to be, and I am not changing it. It's: To be an astronomer and Inventor. I am only a 5th grader, so I'm really thinking ahead, but I have the highest math scores in my class, (And science scores) And I even do math that my TEACHER finds crazy. I just LOVE Astronomy, sooooo much. AS for Inventing, I just...well, also love it. I am able to make circuitry, (Only simple stuff) and draw rocket designs and invention blueprints everyday after I finish whatever test I just finished... So, I find those two things as my goals.

I may also want to teach, (MAYBE, not for sure) And would like to help in other projects too. Like at the LHC or something. I might do some quantum research and stuff too...

So...any tips, pointers? That would be great! Thanks. :smile:
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
berkeman
Mentor
57,286
7,272


Hello, I'm a 5th grader from California, and I already know what I want to be, and I am not changing it. It's: To be an astronomer and Inventor. I am only a 5th grader, so I'm really thinking ahead, but I have the highest math scores in my class, (And science scores) And I even do math that my TEACHER finds crazy. I just LOVE Astronomy, sooooo much. AS for Inventing, I just...well, also love it. I am able to make circuitry, (Only simple stuff) and draw rocket designs and invention blueprints everyday after I finish whatever test I just finished... So, I find those two things as my goals.

I may also want to teach, (MAYBE, not for sure) And would like to help in other projects too. Like at the LHC or something. I might do some quantum research and stuff too...

So...any tips, pointers? That would be great! Thanks. :smile:
Welcome to the PF. Does your school have a Science Fair? If so, that's a great place to combine the science and creativity that you enjoy.

You can also build a few electronics kits, like the ones you can get at Radio Shack and similar stores. That will get you more experience building things, and usually the kits come with some tutorial material and explanations about how the kit electronics works.

Keep it up, and have fun. :smile:
 
  • #3


Cool! Thanks, Um...my school has no science fair, and I AM making Electronic kits...

:D
 
  • #4
491
2


Look into doing some programming. I was your age when I started to learn how to program and it's really quite fun. I know a few other people who have done it too, so if you're interested I think you ought to give it a shot. You don't need any materials, you don't need anything special, just a computer, willingness to learn, internet/google, and you're good to go. You seem like a bright kid, and programming is something that can really be intellectually stimulating, especially if you're so young.

Remember, the important thing is to have fun.
 
  • #5
berkeman
Mentor
57,286
7,272


Cool! Thanks, Um...my school has no science fair, and I AM making Electronic kits...

:D
You might look into the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair:

http://www.intel.com/education/isef/

I'm not sure what the age/grade limit is to start entering the competitions, and I don't know how you enter if your school doesn't have a science fair of its own, but it may be possible. I've seen some of the projects at an Intel Fair last year, and many are very impressive.
 
  • #6


Thanks dude! Awesome!
 
  • #7
D H
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Insights Author
15,393
683


Hello, I'm a 5th grader from California, and I already know what I want to be, and I am not changing it. It's: To be an astronomer and Inventor.
One of the hallmarks of a scientist is having an open mind. So do try to keep your mind open to other paths. There's a lot more to science, technology, engineering, and math than just astronomy and inventing.

Getting involved in science fairs, learning to program: These are some very good suggestions. It's going to take some work, but it is a worth the effort.
 
  • #8
201
0


Keep learning more and more math. No better time than when you're young. Don't give up when you fail, I know you will, everyone does. Keep pushing on.
 
  • #9
chiro
Science Advisor
4,790
131


Hello, I'm a 5th grader from California, and I already know what I want to be, and I am not changing it. It's: To be an astronomer and Inventor. I am only a 5th grader, so I'm really thinking ahead, but I have the highest math scores in my class, (And science scores) And I even do math that my TEACHER finds crazy. I just LOVE Astronomy, sooooo much. AS for Inventing, I just...well, also love it. I am able to make circuitry, (Only simple stuff) and draw rocket designs and invention blueprints everyday after I finish whatever test I just finished... So, I find those two things as my goals.

I may also want to teach, (MAYBE, not for sure) And would like to help in other projects too. Like at the LHC or something. I might do some quantum research and stuff too...

So...any tips, pointers? That would be great! Thanks. :smile:
Welcome to the forums.

What kind of things would you like to invent? Have you been exposed to some field or problem that really captivates you?
 
  • #10


Ah yes! I design efficient rocket designs, and satellites, and such types of things. Sometimes I stray and go to things like quantum mechanical inventions too...

And I always keep ideas open.

((BTW, I also enjoy particle physics, physics, and quantum physics too (oh, and other stuff too)))


Edit: Oh, and of course, Astrophysics!
 
Last edited:
  • #11
6,814
12


So...any tips, pointers? That would be great! Thanks. :smile:
One thing that will help is to buy yourself a telescope and subscribe to astronomy magazine. Visit museums a lot.

Also there are some hobbies that will help you a lot. Learn to program a computer. Build robots from Legos. Photography will help you learn a lot about lens. Do lots of math puzzles.

Have fun.
 
  • #12


Ah yes, I use legos, and I just got a telescope too! Plus a magazine subscription, so I already have that stuff...

:D
 
  • #13
269
1


hmmm, along with cool science one's gotta learn a lot of math to be a good astrophysicist...

How about getting started on some algebra?? Ask your math teacher nicely if she could procure an algebra book for you to look at, I guarantee she'll be impressed and help you if you have any questions.
 
  • #14


Thanks, but I already do that....I'm also learning physics sooo...yeah.
 
  • #15


I also have a subscription to popular science, and go the NASA.com a lot...
 
  • #16
1,199
25


Get a small telescope, read a biography of Galileo, try and repeat some of the things he did. Look at the moon, map the craters. Look at Jupiter, try and work out the orbits of its moons. Search for comets. Map the Pleiades. Endless other things to do! OK you don't see things 'up large', like with the Hubble telescope pictures on the web, but just getting out there and doing smaller things yourself is a great experience, not to be missed - a real contact with the real thing. I remember my early-teen evenings with a three inch refractor with a great deal of nostalgia. Go beyond the books and web! Go beyond what I did (I'm not very hands-on...) - use your inventive prowess to build your own bigger telescope, build in some photography...
 

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