Astronomers Unveil Star Size Limit: What Does it Mean for Cores?

In summary: The trigger of star formation probably isn't the issue. It has more to do with the details of the cloud's collapse.
  • #1
Starship
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0
Astronomers announced that stars have a size limit. What does it say about stars' cores? This is still unknown i'd say.

Btw a new yellow star was discovered outside the solar system. Looks very much like our sun.
 
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  • #2
Starship said:
Astronomers announced that stars have a size limit.

Note that this likely only applies to stars formed recently. Early stars may not be constrained by such limits, as extremely low-metallicity gas will behave quite differently in the process of collapse.


What does it say about stars' cores?

Nothing that I can think of. It mostly just has implications for the process of star formation; that is, the collapse and fragmentation of the molecular clouds.


Btw a new yellow star was discovered outside the solar system. Looks very much like our sun.

I don't think the star was recently discovered, as it's very nearby. This is a story about the first direct imaging of a planet outside the solar system. It was possible because the planet is so far away from its host star.
 
  • #3
SpaceTiger said:
Note that this likely only applies to stars formed recently. Early stars may not be constrained by such limits, as extremely low-metallicity gas will behave quite differently in the process of collapse.

Thanks for reply SpaceTiger. It seems there is some unknown force which triggers star formation. Cold gas clouds collapse to form stars. Looks like powerful magnetic fields.

I don't think the star was recently discovered, as it's very nearby. This is a story about the first direct imaging of a planet outside the solar system. It was possible because the planet is so far away from its host star.

I think the star is named SO025300.5+165258 but I'm not sure though. In 2000 eight new stars were discovered, among them are Sedna and Quaoar. There appears to be an Earth-like planet some 50 light years away. It could be part of another solar system.

Regards
 
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  • #4
Starship said:
Thanks for reply SpaceTiger. It seems there is some unknown force which triggers star formation. Cold gas clouds collapse to form stars. Looks like powerful magnetic fields.

The trigger of star formation probably isn't the issue. It has more to do with the details of the cloud's collapse.


I think the star is named SO025300.5+165258 but I'm not sure though. In 2000 eight new stars were discovered, among them are Sedna and Quaoar.

Those are both Kuiper Belt objects, not stars.
 
  • #5
Theory and observational evidence suggests metallicity drives down the average and maximum mass during star formation:

On the variation of the Initial Mass Function
http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0009005

Evidence for a fundamental stellar upper mass limit from clustered star formation
http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0310860

Very early [population III] stars, which formed when there was little or no metallicity, could have been truly massive compared to the largest stars we see today:

The First Stars
http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0311019

Three Epochs of Star Formation in the High Redshift Universe
http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0208447

Unfortunately, there are none of these big fellows near enough for us to get any decent mass measurements. Then again, that really isn't so unfortunate after all. They are thought to be the progenitors of gamma ray bursts. You really would not want any of these things living in your galactic neighborhood.

Star formation is typically triggered by disturbances in the interstellar medium. Galactic merges trigger huge bursts of star formation activity. Shock waves from supernovae are also frequently blamed, as in the case of our very own near and dear sun.
 
  • #6
AFAIK starbirth is triggered by http://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/Cyberia/Bima/StarForm.html.
 
  • #7
Starship said:
AFAIK starbirth is triggered by http://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/Cyberia/Bima/StarForm.html.

Stars are born inside of GMCs, but the cause of the cloud's collapse is the issue being addressed.
 
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Related to Astronomers Unveil Star Size Limit: What Does it Mean for Cores?

1. What is the star size limit that has been unveiled by astronomers?

The star size limit that has been unveiled by astronomers is around 150 times the mass of our sun. This means that any star that exceeds this mass will most likely collapse into a black hole.

2. How did astronomers determine this star size limit?

Astronomers determined the star size limit by studying the evolution of massive stars and their eventual fate. They also looked at the properties of supernovae, which are the explosions that occur when massive stars reach the end of their life.

3. What does this star size limit mean for cores?

This star size limit means that cores of stars that exceed 150 times the mass of our sun will most likely collapse into black holes. This is because the force of gravity is too strong for any other forces to counteract, resulting in a black hole.

4. Are there any exceptions to this star size limit?

There may be some exceptions to this star size limit, as there are still many unknowns about the formation and evolution of stars. However, based on current observations and theories, it is believed that this limit is fairly accurate.

5. How does this discovery impact our understanding of the universe?

This discovery provides further insight into the properties and behavior of massive stars, which are crucial components in the formation and evolution of galaxies. It also adds to our understanding of the fate of massive stars and the potential formation of black holes in the universe.

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