Astronomy Q&A Game

  • Thread starter Nicool002
  • Start date
  • #1
[SOLVED] Astronomy Q&A Game

Hi guys! Most of you know how this works but for the newcomers:

The rules are this: someone will ask a question and if the question is not answered correctly within 3 days then a new question will be posted. If an answer to a question is posted and the person that posted the question does not respond to the answer within 2 to 3 days, then the first person to have answered the question will then be able to post their own question. HAVE FUN AND LEARN!

I will start:

Question: What is the brightest star in the Northern Sky? (excluding the sun)
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Sting
157
2
I'm making an educated guess here:

Alpha Canis Majoris (Sirius)?


Techincally, I think Deneb is the "brightest" but only in absolute magnitude. It's so far away that it really doesn't make much of a difference since its apparent magnitude is not as bright as Sirius.

Hey it's only a guess.
 
  • #3
Phobos
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,954
6
oh, man. I better lock this now before you guys swamp our server resources again.
-jk
 
  • #4
haha *hurt look* us? Phobos why ever would you say that? hehe


Yes sting you are correct, your go.
 
  • #5
Sting
157
2
My go? My turn to ask a question (I never participated in the original thread so I have no idea how this works)?

Okay, my question: What is the name of the large multiringed basin located on Mercury at a longitude of 180 degrees?
 
  • #6
I believe that it is the Caloris Basin. Am I correct?
 
  • #7
Sting
157
2
$#%^! I sure pick easy questions don't I?

Yes, you got it right. I guess, it's "your go"
 
  • #8
I knew that from when I studied Astronomy for Science Olympiad (By the way guys I got a gold medal in Astronomy for the Competition )


Ok. True Or False

Do we havea supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy?
 
  • #9
Sting
157
2
Shoot, that was quick...

Uhhh truefalse...

Actually, I don't know if it was ever "proven" but I'm going with "true"
 
  • #10
Correct, it is true. On Discover, they lookd at something like 37 galaxies and in each one, they found a supermassive black hole. Then, they looked at our galaxy and guesss what they found... Oh wait, sting already said it.
 
  • #11
Sting
157
2
Yippee!

Okay, I guess it's my turn:

What is the name given to the energy generation in which a stellar object initiates helium burning by the triple-alpha process?
 
  • #12
OK I don't think I know this one but I'm going to go out on a limb and say the Nuclear Fusion that a star relies on to live.... but I am not sure if that's right.
 
  • #13
Kerrie
Staff Emeritus
Gold Member
841
15
for how many years does pluto enter into neptune's orbit, and how many years does it take pluto to make one revolution around the sun?

no cheating...
 
  • #14
Kerrie I'm going to answer your question but first The way I put it in the rules was that one question had to be answered before the next was asked that way you don't have a bunch of questions going on at once :smile:

Answer: Pluto takes 247 years that is the first answer. The second is... well I am not sure but I think it is around 100 years although that is basicaly just a guess.
 
  • #15
Sting
157
2
OK I don't think I know this one but I'm going to go out on a limb and say the Nuclear Fusion that a star relies on to live.... but I am not sure if that's right.

Generally, yes, but I was thinking more of a specific name but I'll give you a clue (two words)
 
  • #16
bogdan
191
0
helium fusion...?
 
Last edited:
  • #17
What is the 'helium flash'?
 
  • #18
Raavin
87
0
how many years does it take pluto to make one revolution around the sun

Well if I was being tricky I would say exactly 1. Plutonian year that is :wink:

Raavin
 
  • #19
Darn, I do believe damgo got it.
 
  • #20
Originally posted by Raavin
Well if I was being tricky I would say exactly 1. Plutonian year that is :wink:

Raavin

It takes pluto 250 Earth years to make one revolution around the sun.
 
  • #21
Raavin
87
0
I think Damgo got it too. The 'initiation' would seem to be the helium flash which continues into helium fusion. I think that's right, as the helium fuses to carbon 12, then you then have carbon flash and I assume you could have oxygen and neon flash but, for reasons that elude me, it would seem that it is naturally unlikely do to the changes/reduction in pressure until it gets to iron.

Raavin
 
Last edited:
  • #22
Sting
157
2
Yep, he's right.

Helium flash was the answer I was looking for.
 
  • #23
:) Hmm.... okay, what does /\-CDM stand for, and what is it?
 
  • #24
jjalexand
67
0
Can we have a normal Astronomy category

This may sound a bit sour but... now we are starting a new leaf, how about you starting a separate topic called "Astronomy Questions Game" so we can use the word "Astronomy" for a general topic of Astronomy without turning it into a sort of "Who wants to be a Millionaire" (an Aussie TV program :)

By the way, what happened to all the old posts, have they been classified due to the impending war or something?

[ome]
 
  • #25
bogdan
191
0
...cold dark matter...
...cold dark matter is composed of objects massive enough to move at sub-relativistic velocities...
 
  • #26
cragwolf
169
0
Originally posted by damgo
:) Hmm.... okay, what does /\-CDM stand for, and what is it?

As the previous poster pointed out CDM stands for cold dark matter, but the /\ stands for the dark energy or cosmological constant. I couldn't begin to tell you what cold dark matter is or what dark energy is, because no one knows! :smile:
 
  • #27
bogdan
191
0
I have turned to the darkside...
For I have tasted the truth...
(CEO Morgan's Recycling Tanks of Humour)
 
  • #28
Yep, cragwolf got it.... it's the cosmological model with large lamda, omega_matter mostly dark.
 
  • #29
Well first off JJalexand were you on the old PF? and second off it's because this was the name on the old PF and I didn't want to change it and this thread IS about astronomy. I made it a game so it would be more fun.


(as you can see I had to change my name having login troubles seeing what we can do about it)
 
  • #30
cragwolf
169
0
Originally posted by damgo
Yep, cragwolf got it.... it's the cosmological model with large lamda, omega_matter mostly dark.

Hi damgo, can you award the prize to Bogdan, since he got most of the question right, and I'm feeling generous? :smile:
 
  • #31
Well right now I don't know the answer to your question. I will try to find the answer but I can't really guarantee anything. Does anyone know the answer?
 
  • #32
bogdan
191
0
What question ?[?]
 
  • #33
sure...
 
  • #34
I believe it is CragWolf's question now am I right? SO go ahead and ask away crag.
 
  • #35
cragwolf
169
0
No, it's bogdan's question. Go ahead, bogdan, ask any astronomy question you like.
 

Suggested for: Astronomy Q&A Game

  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
588
  • Last Post
Replies
9
Views
555
  • Last Post
Replies
0
Views
618
Replies
4
Views
503
  • Last Post
4
Replies
122
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
Replies
17
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
860
Replies
35
Views
3K
Replies
3
Views
469
Top