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Stargazing Astrophotography photos

  1. Sep 2, 2004 #1

    Phobos

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    Looking for advice?
    Willing to share your expertise with other PF members?
    Brave enough to share & discuss your own astrophotos?
    Then this is the thread for you.
    Enjoy!

    In all our cosmological discussions, let's not forget to actually go stargazing once in a while! :biggrin:

    Thanks to member check for this suggestion!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 6, 2004 #2
    I figure I'd post this. It's a mosaic I made of the moon one night. Took a bunch of photos (I thought I had covered the whole moon, but as you can see I missed some spots).
    In this mosaic the moon is about 80cm across. There’s a 15 cm ruler next to it for a sense of scale. Not huge, but it goes to show you one of the many neat things that you can do if u have a printer, a telescope and a digital camera.
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Sep 7, 2004 #3

    turbo

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    Here is a little picture of the Lagoon Nebula. I did the same thing with it as the Orion Nebula picture - imaged a 5x7 print with my Olympus, then unsharp-masked it in Photoshop to bring out fine detail in the nebulosity.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2008
  5. Sep 15, 2004 #4
    http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0409/catsEye_hst_c1.jpg




    Rings in the Haloes of Planetary Nebulae
    http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0401056



    One has to know, in what context the challenge is being made and answered. Those "rings" to me, look like tree rings? :smile:

    http://web.mit.edu/8.03/www/walter-ring-sm.jpg

    http://web.mit.edu/8.03/www/

    If one is studingthe physics and approach of what is taking place inthe cosmos with such views to its quantum nature, it is hard not to be drawn to these beautiful events. It is even more difficult, to refrain from offering a explanation , if it is offered as a challenge. You just should known what context this is being offered, it was not offered for the general public. But someone did make it so.

    So why would anyone not rise to occasion?
     
  6. Sep 17, 2004 #5

    turbo

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    You have taken a very nice underexposed picture of your reflection (probably on a shiny icy surface) surrounded by an ice halo. Solar ice halos can be very beautiful in these higher latitudes, and even the fainter lunar halos can be stunning if your eyes are properly adapted to darkness. I don't need the extra credit (unless you could boost my 1972 grade in my initial-[and gut wrenching!] - philosophy course in Meta-ethics), but could you get me a discount on my prescription medications? You're not Canadian by any chance, eh?
    :wink:
     
  7. Oct 24, 2004 #6
    How about solar Art?

    Is this just for astrophotography?


    Twistedseer
     

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    Last edited: Oct 24, 2004
  8. Oct 28, 2004 #7

    tony873004

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  9. Dec 2, 2004 #8

    Aether

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    Venus Transit June 8, 2004

    Here is a picture that my girlfriend, Anne, and I took of the planet Venus as it made a rare transit across the face of the Sun on June 8, 2004.

    The other photo is of me on the beach at Assateague Island in Virgina while shooting some video of the transit.

    The telescope we used for this was a Meade ETX-70, and a hand-held Sony Cybershot digital camera.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2006
  10. Dec 5, 2004 #9
    Looks good! Much better than the pics of teh transit that I churned out. lol
     
  11. Dec 5, 2004 #10

    Aether

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    Thanks check. I'm glad to hear that you got a chance to see it for yourself!

    Here is a link to a page with the original photo which is about 3MB in size:

     
  12. Dec 8, 2004 #11

    tony873004

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  13. Dec 11, 2004 #12

    turbo

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  14. Mar 3, 2005 #13
    hey .........i never thought this board have this important threads!
    hey man believe me!
    i had a digi cam......... how can i have some good astro pix?
     
  15. Mar 3, 2005 #14

    russ_watters

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    You mean a regular point and shoot digital camera? Dunno - I just bought a mount for my Nikon Coolpix 3100 and hopefully in the next few days I'll see what it can do through my scope. Since it doesn't have manual exposures, its probably only good for planets and the moon. If you have a digital SLR, you can take some outstanding high-res pics of galaxies and nebula. Do you have a telescope? Big lens? Binoculars?
     
  16. Aug 18, 2005 #15

    I can’t afford such luxuries as Digital camera. :cry:

    I used my Canon EOS 50E; It was loaded with a colour 200ISO film and a 28mm – 80mm telefocus lens set to 30mm and stopped at f4. The film was exposed was for 5 min.

    The camera was piggybacked on my telescope, a basic Celestron 114EQshort on an equitorial mount.

    The photo has been heavily shopped! I took out the colour first and then just played around with the levels until I got some thing that looked good.

    I’m going to try the same shot (as soon as the weather clears) with an ISO 400 and attempt a 10 min exposure, as I’ve seen some pics recently on the net of the Summer triangle with some great colours in it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2005
  17. Oct 20, 2005 #16
    I was afraid that would happen after you posted the pictures of the guts. Those nested nylon gears are a grease-pump, designed to make that goo migrate everywhere except perhaps where it's needed most. I'm afraid that on really cold nights, the grease will firm up, and those little nylon gears on their skinny shafts will deflect and cause guiding errors as globs of the grease feed into tight places. It's good that you have the mechanical aptitude to tinker with that rascal. If the gearbox was properly isolated from all electrical parts, I would recommend cleaning out the grease with carb-cleaner (available at auto-parts stores) and lubricating with powdered graphite instead, so the nylon gears would last longer, but conductive lubricants are not an option when electronics are in the neighborhood. Maybe you could lubricate with a high-quality oil like Break-Free (available at all good gun shops). It's got good film strength and doesn't evaporate and leave gummy residues like some lubricating oils. Another good choice would be Royal Purple synthetic lubricant or perhaps even some Mobile 1 - that stuff stays fluid at 30 below and has better film-strength than any petroleum-based lubricant that I have tested.
     
  18. Nov 7, 2005 #17

    turbo

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    By all means, join the Seattle Astronomical Society. They have a number of members who have volunteered to help people learn about aspects of astronomy:

    http://www.seattleastro.org/resources.html

    They also have a "library" of telescopes that can be "checked out" for up to a month at a time by members. Taking advantage of this service might help you figure out what kind of telescope might be right for you, and save you from making a potentially expensive mistake.

    http://www.seattleastro.org/telescopelibrary.html
     
  19. Dec 7, 2005 #18
    What is the most affordable process to take digital pictures with a telescope and also get decent quality pictures? I was wanting a digital telescope for christmas but it is out of my price range.
     
  20. Dec 25, 2005 #19
    Wow..cool stuff guys. I'm new to this. :) anyone wanna give me some starter tips, maybe tell me what I should have to start? o_O
     
  21. Dec 25, 2005 #20

    russ_watters

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    Well...do you have any equipment now? What is your experience level, pricerange, etc?
     
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