Astrophysics databases — Where can I find them?

  • #1
Homework Statement:
Astrophysics database for essay
Relevant Equations:
Astrophysics database
Hi guys, so I was trying to start my extended essay for IB physics in astrophysics and I came up with an idea of looking at how redshift changes based on different cosmological distances. However I can’t find any databases from NASA, esa, etc. is there anything you guys can suggest? Any help is greatly appreciated!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #3
Perhaps begin with The Sloan Digital Sky Survey at https://www.sdss.org/ .
Thanks for the suggestion! Is there anything in particular regarding redshift tho?
 
  • #4
gneill
Mentor
20,925
2,867
I think that the SDSS results include redshift info amongst others.
 
  • #5
phyzguy
Science Advisor
4,891
1,831
It depends what you're looking for. Why don't you try starting with the SkyServer at this link? You can pan around looking at objects, and if you find one you are interested in, you click on the "Quick Look" button, and it will take you to a link like this one, which gives the redshift (z) of this object, which is 0.0948.... There are also many catalogs of objects at this site, but you will need to invest time to learn how to use them.

As for your OP, once you know the redshift of the object, do you have a proposal for an independent way to find the distance?
 
  • #6
It depends what you're looking for. Why don't you try starting with the SkyServer at this link? You can pan around looking at objects, and if you find one you are interested in, you click on the "Quick Look" button, and it will take you to a link like this one, which gives the redshift (z) of this object, which is 0.0948.... There are also many catalogs of objects at this site, but you will need to invest time to learn how to use them.

As for your OP, once you know the redshift of the object, do you have a proposal for an independent way to find the distance?
To calculate the distance I was thinking to use the redshift parameter. I haven’t really studied this yet, but I found this redshift table and of values at this website (https://lco.global/spacebook/light/redshift/) and could use algebra to find it. Is there a more systematic way to find it that you know of? For the database, that looks great, I’ll have a look around and try to figure it out!
 

Related Threads on Astrophysics databases — Where can I find them?

  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
544
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
257
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
987
Top