1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Atom Project

  1. Jun 1, 2005 #1
    I have this science project where I have to construct a model atom. I don't want to make it out of styrofoam because that's what everybody does and I really want to make a good project that stands out. We get extra points if we use electricity and it cannot be edible. I was wondering if anyone could help me brainstorm ideas that would are cool and not the typical styrofoam project. I thought I should somehow get the electrons to move around the atom but I don't know exactly how to do that. That is the only thing I could come up with. So if anyone has any ideas will you please try and help?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 1, 2005 #2

    Ouabache

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    How about building hanging mobile. These indicate rotation of objects.
    You might even think of a way to make the mobile turn using electricity.:rolleyes:
     
  4. Jun 1, 2005 #3

    brewnog

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I think it would be impressive if you somehow made a model which showed the relative sizes of the particles inside the atom.

    I really like Ouabache's suggestion of a mobile, although I'm not sure how you could incorporate electricity into it, other than making it turn round.
     
  5. Jun 1, 2005 #4

    JamesU

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    why don't you light ceartain parts up? like electrons, protons and neutrons could be lit in different colors. as for what to make it out of...I'm not real sure
     
  6. Jun 1, 2005 #5

    brewnog

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member


    Oooh that could be pretty sexy!

    Have the protons, neutrons and electrons wired on seperate circuits in different colours! Just set some LEDs inside some embedding resin! Yeahhh!
     
  7. Jun 1, 2005 #6

    JamesU

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    listen to brewnog's ideas...don't pay attention to the rest..it's a skill we've learned
     
  8. Jun 1, 2005 #7

    brewnog

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    It's not a skill you've learnt, it's a skill I've beaten into you! :tongue:
     
  9. Jun 1, 2005 #8

    JamesU

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    over time you'll learn how to skim posts in GD and only read the important words like "franzbear" or "stupid"
     
  10. Jun 1, 2005 #9
    You couldn't model the atom to actual size because particles make up less than 1 percent of the space. The rest is just, empty space. You wouldn't be able to see the project at all.
     
  11. Jun 2, 2005 #10
    Just to be different , you can also do something odd.

    As per HeisenBerg's Principle , we cannot define an orbit to an electron , so what you do is that you make a nucleus, which should be pretty dense, and around it make an "electron cloud" , which should be like a cotton round ball with different probabilities of finding an electron.

    By the way are you making a model of some genuine element or making a general atom?
     
  12. Jun 2, 2005 #11

    Pyrrhus

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    When you say you're doing the "atom model", which model are you planning to use? Rutherford's? Bohr's? Scrondinger's? Thomson's?

    The classic is Bohr's.
     
  13. Jun 2, 2005 #12
    I think I'm supposed to make a model of that one, but I'm not sure because our teacher only taught us one. The model we learned can be easily be drawn on paper as a nucleous with electrons in rings around it, but I'm not sure that it matter which model I use.

    I am making a model of argon, because I think it sounds cool, and Einsteinium had too many protons to model. What do you mean by "different probabilities of finding an electron"? That they aren't placed in a pattern or evenly spaced? Sorry, I'm not used to terminology that sophisticated. :redface:

    Thanks for all of the great ideas. I'm going to try and incorporate them all into my project so it'll be really cool. :cool: Thanks a lot, I could've never thought of any of that on my own.
    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
     
  14. Jun 2, 2005 #13
    Being a science fair project, I am sure the teacher is not expecting much, but thats no reason not to go the extra mile.

    I always wanted to make a gyroscope atom as a project, but never was required to make a science project, so my dream was never realized, so I pass it on to anyone who wants to make it... :)


    Find three clear rings (plexiglass, resin, whatever type of ring you can find) each one smaller then the next, then attach these by drilling a hole at two apposing sides, making sure the wholes are aligned, the middle ring will need four holes, two for the inside ring, two for the outside ring. Make sure they are perpendicular. Attach semi-transparent orbs around these rings (this can be done several ways, but easiest would be to cut the orbs in half and attach them to the rings with glue. (make sure you have room to rotate the rings inside each other with the rings) Also, remember the electrons must balance each other on the rings one at each opposite side of each other, and also remember only 2(n^2) atoms on each ring (where n is the ring number, 1, 2, 3 etc)

    Now you can use leds to light up the rings which would light up the atoms, or you can use motors to rotate the rings.

    I personally wanted to use magnetism to levitate the middle nucleus, but a simple rod/string across the inner most ring would be sufficient, though the nucleus would rotate along with the electrons (not a big deal since I dont think it is proven otherwise). If you could do the magnetism, your teacher would defecate, Im pretty sure.

    Anyhow, whatever you choose, Im sure it will rock, and whatever you do, you should take a couple pictures and post them here so we can see your handiwork!

    Good luck!
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Atom Project
  1. Collision of Atoms (Replies: 1)

  2. Atomic Spectra (Replies: 9)

  3. Atoms, Uncertainty (Replies: 10)

Loading...