Atomic absorption of mercury

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of using a longer wavelength, specifically 365 nm, for mercury vapor detection instead of the commonly used 253.6 nm. It is noted that this wavelength is still within the UV range and will be absorbed by the mercury vapor, but may require a more sensitive instrument to detect the absorption. It is suggested to test this using a spectrophotometer to measure the absorbance of the vapor at the longer wavelength.
  • #1
zendium0
1
0
Hello!

Mercury vapour detection is normally performed at 253.6 nm, which is the lowest emission line in the UVC range.
I have to figure out if a similar atomic absorption approach would be valid at a longer wavelength, specifically at 365 nm, which is an other emission line but into the UVA range.
I guess 253.6 nm was always used because it is the most abundant radiation emitted by simple discharge in a mercury vapour lamp, but would it also work ar 365 nm from a laser system?

Thanks to anybody helping...

Federico
 
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  • #2
Yes, you can use 365 nm for mercury vapor detection. This wavelength is still within the UV range and will be absorbed by the mercury vapor. The only difference is that it may require a more sensitive instrument to detect the absorption. A laser system could work as long as it has sufficient power to detect the absorption of the wavelength. This can be tested by using a spectrophotometer to measure the absorbance of the mercury vapor at the wavelength.
 
  • #3


Hello Federico,

Thank you for your question. Atomic absorption of mercury can indeed be performed at different wavelengths, including the longer wavelength of 365 nm. While 253.6 nm is commonly used due to its abundance in mercury vapor lamps, using a laser system at a different wavelength can also be effective.

The absorption of mercury at different wavelengths is determined by its electronic structure and the energy levels of its atoms. At 365 nm, mercury atoms can still absorb radiation and produce a measurable signal. However, the sensitivity and specificity of the measurement may vary compared to using 253.6 nm.

It is important to consider the specific experimental setup and conditions when using a different wavelength for atomic absorption of mercury. Factors such as the intensity and stability of the light source, as well as the sample preparation, can affect the accuracy and reliability of the results.

In conclusion, using a different wavelength for atomic absorption of mercury can be valid, but it is crucial to carefully optimize and validate the experimental conditions to obtain accurate and meaningful data. I hope this helps. Best of luck with your research!
 

1. What is atomic absorption of mercury?

Atomic absorption of mercury is a scientific technique used to measure the concentration of mercury in a sample by analyzing the absorption of light by atoms of mercury. This method is based on the principle that each element has a unique pattern of light absorption, allowing for the identification and quantification of specific elements in a sample.

2. How does atomic absorption of mercury work?

In atomic absorption of mercury, the sample is atomized and then exposed to a beam of light at a specific wavelength. As the light passes through the sample, the atoms of mercury will absorb some of the light, causing a reduction in the intensity of the light beam. The amount of light absorbed is directly proportional to the concentration of mercury in the sample, allowing for the quantification of mercury in the sample.

3. What are the advantages of using atomic absorption for mercury analysis?

One of the main advantages of atomic absorption of mercury is its high sensitivity and specificity. This method can detect very low concentrations of mercury in a sample, making it useful for environmental and health monitoring. Additionally, this technique is relatively quick and easy to perform, and it does not require any complex sample preparation.

4. What are the limitations of atomic absorption for mercury analysis?

One of the limitations of atomic absorption for mercury analysis is that it can only detect and quantify one element at a time. This means that if a sample contains multiple elements, they will need to be analyzed separately. Additionally, this method may not be suitable for samples with high levels of interfering substances, as they can affect the accuracy of the results.

5. How is atomic absorption of mercury used in real-world applications?

Atomic absorption of mercury is commonly used in environmental monitoring to measure the levels of mercury in water, soil, and air. It is also used in industrial settings to monitor mercury levels in manufacturing processes and to ensure compliance with regulations. In addition, this technique is used in medical research to study the effects of mercury exposure on human health and to monitor mercury levels in biological samples such as blood and urine.

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