Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

In summary, the results of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy can be affected if the metal is in the form of ions. This means that if a sample contains both dissolved ions and solid particles, the absorption may not be accurately measured. In AAS, the entire sample must be in solution in order to be aspirated into the flame, as solids cannot be analyzed. The flame itself is a plasma containing various elements, including the metal being analyzed. In this process, ions play a role in the formation of the plasma.
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Are the results of Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy affected if the metal were ions? For example, if you were trying to measure the amount of zinc in a sample but part of it was dissolved as ions and other parts were simply solid, would they measure the same absorption or would the ions not be counted?
 
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  • #2
What wavelength is used in AAS?
 
  • #3
In AAS the entire sample must be in solution since it is aspirated into the flame (solids are a no-show). The flame is a plasma of several things including zinc, if that's what is being analyzed. What role do ions play in a plasma?
 

Related to Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

1. What is Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy?

Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) is an analytical technique used to determine the concentration of a particular element in a sample. It measures the amount of light absorbed by the atoms of the element when it is vaporized and excited by a light source.

2. How does AAS work?

AAS works by passing a beam of light through a sample containing the element of interest. The atoms in the sample absorb some of the light, and the remaining light is then measured by a detector. The amount of light absorbed is proportional to the concentration of the element in the sample.

3. What are the advantages of AAS?

AAS is a highly sensitive and precise technique, able to detect elements at very low concentrations. It is also a relatively fast and cost-effective method compared to other analytical techniques.

4. What types of samples can be analyzed using AAS?

AAS can be used to analyze a wide range of samples, including liquids, solids, and gases. The sample must be in a liquid or gaseous form during the analysis, so solid samples must first be dissolved or vaporized.

5. What are the limitations of AAS?

AAS is limited to the detection of elements that can be vaporized and excited by the light source. It is also unable to differentiate between different oxidation states of an element. Additionally, matrix effects from other elements in the sample can interfere with the accuracy of the results.

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