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Augh I am in pain

  1. May 15, 2005 #1
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    Last edited: May 15, 2005
  2. jcsd
  3. May 15, 2005 #2

    Math Is Hard

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    taking the summer off sounds nice. I think I'm going to take 3 classes this summer, though. so much for vacation.
     
  4. May 15, 2005 #3

    Hurkyl

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    Didn't your mother ever teach you not to run with an... er... intermittent line of dashes?
     
  5. May 15, 2005 #4
    Nice for you!
     
  6. May 15, 2005 #5
    Basically, MIH, I do not see things the same way you do. Classes are a privilege, not a duty. Not taking classes is a painful waste of time.
     
  7. May 15, 2005 #6

    Math Is Hard

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    whoa - hang on there! I never said what you are suggesting. Yes, taking classes are a privilege and one for which I'm grateful - otherwise I wouldn't bother. I work 40 hours a week and drag my tired butt to classes on nights and weekends. It makes me long for a little break sometimes - like a nice summer getaway. :smile: That's all I am saying.

    If you don't want to go all summer without classes, then can't you sign up for some?
     
  8. May 16, 2005 #7

    honestrosewater

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    :rofl:

    BicycleTree,
    Why not study on your own? You could cover Cormen et al or the like over the summer. If you want credit, does your school do credit by assessment (prior/experiential learning)? You could possibly earn credit for what you learn that way. You may also want to look into taking classes at a nearby college as a visiting or transient student.
     
  9. May 17, 2005 #8
    Yes, I am planning to learn on my own. I don't know if I'm going to be getting any credit for it but I couldn't stand to be twiddling my thumbs all summer.
     
  10. May 17, 2005 #9

    Moonbear

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    The general solution to that problem is: Get a JOB! :biggrin: At least that's what my mom always told me.
     
  11. May 17, 2005 #10
    A job would also be like twiddling my thumbs. I am not qualified enough yet to get a job that would actually give me valuable experience. A few thousand bucks is not a good substitute for a summer where I'm not learning anything.
     
  12. May 17, 2005 #11

    Moonbear

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    Every job is valuable experience. Even if you're working at your local fast food place, you learn something about customer service, restaurant sanitation (or how badly it is lacking, depending on the place), dealing with co-workers, etc. There are always middle and high school students who are struggling with summer school who could use a good math tutor.

    But, if you're fortunate enough not to need a job, then you could instead do volunteer work. Volunteer for something like Habitat for Humanity and learn how to build a house; you gain some valuable skills, hands-on knowlege of how those engineering principles you learn in the classroom get applied in reality and do someone some good in the process. Or find a youth center that could use someone to help kids with computers. You can decide how many hours to volunteer, and spend the rest of the time in self-study. Heck, you could volunteer or get a job at a library. If you're prone to spending time there anyway, might as well spend a few hours a day shelving some books.

    There are always ways for someone with an active mind to find something to do that keeps both mind and hands occupied that does not necessarily require book learning.
     
  13. May 17, 2005 #12
    I think that I could spend my time most productively by actually learning things. You have no idea of my situation. Don't offer advice to people you don't know.

    My discrete math text says in the introduction that is has about 3 full courses of material in it, and I've only done one of those. I could go through that. I could gain experience with Java and C++. I could get a more advanced text on formal logic. I could learn more calculus and work through the rest of my statistics textbook. I could learn about operating systems and networking. There are many possibilities. But no... serving fries would be way more educational than learning real analysis... what was I thinking... thanks for setting me straight on that.
     
  14. May 17, 2005 #13

    Moonbear

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    Sorry, I assumed that because you were posting here, you were seeking advice. I'll remember not to give you advice in the future.
     
  15. May 17, 2005 #14
    My main reason for posting here was to make sure everyone is aware of my pain. :tongue: Anyway, you should note... all there is left of the original post since shortly after I posted it is a line of dashes.

    Advice is not always bad. However, you should not give advice when you don't understand the full situation you are giving advice about.
     
  16. May 17, 2005 #15

    Moonbear

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    I did note that, and never saw the original post, so I didn't respond until you continued discussion. I was only commenting on your later comments. I assume you deleted the original because you changed your mind about discussing whatever was there.

    You don't have to take my advice, and I didn't tell you there was only one thing to do. It was more a list of some alternatives, on the chance that a different perspective might help you find a solution to whatever problem you're "in pain" over. You can take it or leave it, but it was offered in an effort to be helpful.
     
  17. May 17, 2005 #16
    None of these things will teach you how to socialize with people. That is also an important skill.
     
  18. May 17, 2005 #17

    Danger

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    In this case, I think that would be a lot like teaching a bowling ball to swim.
     
  19. May 18, 2005 #18

    honestrosewater

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    Well, I like Moonbear and BicycleTree and hope there's no bitterness between you two. :smile:
     
  20. May 18, 2005 #19

    Moonbear

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    Nope, no bitterness, at least not on my end. :smile: Though, it seems BT and I just don't manage to communicate well here. I write one thing, and he seems to interpret it as something else; I really don't know how this keeps happening, but there's no malice intended. I just chalk it up to life; sometimes other people just see things differently from ourselves.
     
  21. May 18, 2005 #20
    You could always cut them in half and hollow them out and seal them back up, maybe adding a layer of lead on the inside as ballast to keep the original weight. If there were enough air inside the bowling ball then it would float, and it would still function normally as a bowling ball too.

    Should I get a patent for floating bowling balls? I can't tell you how many I've lost in water traps.
     
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