Authors of books on wisdom and life

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  • #1
cronxeh
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Ok so as I'm reading various reviews on books by various authors, I get this weird question popping in my mind - where do they get off with their pompous proclamation of sagacity?

Have they accomplished something ground breaking? Have they told a story that explains something? What do you think about books of those kind?

I've read brief descriptions of those books:

The Road Less Traveled (by M. Scott Peck, MD): A New Psychology of Love, Traditional Values and Spiritual Growth
By melding love, science, and religion into a primer on personal growth, M. Scott Peck launched his highly successful writing and lecturing career with this book. Even to this day, Peck remains at the forefront of spiritual psychology as a result of The Road Less Traveled. In the era of I'm OK, You're OK, Peck was courageous enough to suggest that "life is difficult" and personal growth is a "complex, arduous and lifelong task." His willingness to expose his own life stories as well as to share the intimate stories of his anonymous therapy clients creates a compelling and heartfelt narrative.
Tuesdays with Morrie (by Mitch Albom) :
This true story about the love between a spiritual mentor and his pupil has soared to the bestseller list for many reasons. For starters: it reminds us of the affection and gratitude that many of us still feel for the significant mentors of our past. It also plays out a fantasy many of us have entertained: what would it be like to look those people up again, tell them how much they meant to us, maybe even resume the mentorship? Plus, we meet Morrie Schwartz--a one of a kind professor, whom the author describes as looking like a cross between a biblical prophet and Christmas elf. And finally we are privy to intimate moments of Morrie's final days as he lies dying from a terminal illness. Even on his deathbed, this twinkling-eyed mensch manages to teach us all about living robustly and fully. Kudos to author and acclaimed sports columnist Mitch Albom for telling this universally touching story with such grace and humility.
Ok so tell me this : my grandmother was a Biologist and on her death bed from cancer she gave me some life advise as well, something similar along the lines of the those aforementioned books. I dont see the predicament how her life experience and suffering somehow made her all the wiser? Tell me this - why do people in pain and despair seem to think that afterwards they are somehow enlightened with the higher wisdom and the insight, yet never really know what the answer is, or what the question was in the first place?
 

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  • #2
Evo
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There are many, many people in the world that are in need of emotional support. They go through life feeling like they are missing something, they can't cope, they're forever tragic and they need to "be given" externally what they lack internally. They need someone to tell them they're ok. I guess where ever they find what ever they think they're missing is ok. If a book makes them feel better, that's good.

I don't personally understand these people and I come across as unfeeling and uncaring of their emotional problems. :redface:

I would be a terrible therapist. My responses would be "Get over it!" Get a life!" "stop whining". Yeah, I'm a bad person. :frown:
 
  • #3
Astronuc
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Some people feel compelled to share their philosophy or insight into life - and they make good money - although some authors donate to charity. Actually that is a simplistic generalization - there are many reasons.

Then just think of all those evangelists who feel compelled to spread 'the good word'.

Cronxeh - As for what your grandmother experienced, perhaps the signifcance will occur to you when you take your last breath in this world, which hopefully will be many years from now.

Evo said:
I come across as unfeeling and uncaring of their emotional problems.

I'm a bad person.
Nah! :smile:
 
  • #4
cronxeh
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Astronuc said:
Cronxeh - As for what your grandmother experienced, perhaps the signifcance will occur to you when you take your last breath in this world, which hopefully will be many years from now.
I dont doubt that she was a wise woman. I was watching the Medal of Honor recepients' stories today, and it was about the medic in the wars - I was very touched by a few of their stories, and in general I think there is a difference between being an evangelical who spreads the 'good word' and someone who spreads the good word who happened to have seen the war and taken the hits and still picked up whatever traces of dignity and strength they've had and saved their fellow men.
 
  • #5
Astronuc
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cronxeh said:
. . . in general I think there is a difference between being an evangelical who spreads the 'good word' and someone who spreads the good word who happened to have seen the war and taken the hits and still picked up whatever traces of dignity and strength they've had and saved their fellow men.
Yes, I agree, there is quite a difference.

In the OP, one could have also mentioned the author Deepak Chopra, and many others.

As Evo mentioned, there are many, many people in the world that are in need of emotional support - or they just need a little help from the outside because they have trouble figuring it out inside. Some people seek support through religion and other forms of spirituality, and others through therapy.
 

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