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Baby birds

  1. Apr 24, 2009 #1

    Moonbear

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    I have a nest of wrens. :biggrin: It was a nice warm day today, so I was sitting outside reading on the deck after work and noticed a wren carrying a bug over to a corner of my deck where I have a bunch of gardening supplies stacked up. Then I saw the grass/straw sticking out of the watering can that's lying on its side on top of a small table but under a larger one. So, after it flew away, I went over to peek. Yep, I've got a few little baby wrens nested in my watering can. I've never seen a wren's nest up close...wow, what an elaborate ordeal!

    I can't see inside well to see the babies, mostly can just see little beaks sticking up. I tried getting a photo, but couldn't get enough light inside to get a photo to come out (and no way to stabilize my hand to take a longer exposure photo either). So, no pictures. If I sit quietly again tomorrow, I might have more luck getting photos of mom and dad. I looked up the fledging age for Carolina wrens (that's what I think they are...they have a white bar over the eyes...definitely wrens), and it's about 2 weeks...then a little more time for them to be fully independent of mom and dad. Phew! They should be fully fledged and on their own by the time I need to move the patio furniture and gardening supplies, so will be able to safely clean out their nest. I can't wait to watch them fledging!
     
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  3. Apr 24, 2009 #2

    Astronuc

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    We had a pair of wrens who nested in a flower hanging basket. We kept seeing them around the porch, and visiting the basket, but it wasn't until the babies started chirping that we found the nest. We were present when the babies took first flight, and we watched the parents standby while the little ones flew to the ground then tried to get airborne.
     
  4. Apr 24, 2009 #3

    Math Is Hard

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    Careful, Moonie. They might imprint on you. :)

    Do they look like this little Carolina Wren?
    BabyCarolinaWren1.jpg
     
  5. Apr 24, 2009 #4
    Aww, water can babies, thats so cute. I love watching baby birds. Good luck with the photos.
     
  6. Apr 24, 2009 #5

    lisab

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    Ah, nothing like watching birds raise their young...such a sweet sight.

    At our old house we had barn swallows living in our barn (uh, well, of course...by default!). The babies would fledge and the family would fly, fly, fly all around the yard all day, chirping in joy (ok, I totally understand that's anthropomorphic!).

    Sometimes they would fledge a second set of babies. So wonderful, watching them grow and fledge.
     
  7. Apr 24, 2009 #6

    Moonbear

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    I think they're fairly newly hatched. I can't see much of them yet, but that's partly what makes me think they're still tiny. If they had poofy feathers, I think they'd be more visible. The bar over the eye is similar to what the parents have, though. House wrens don't have the bar.

    I was also surprised that the parents didn't seem to mind Ember outside with me today (I had her on her harness and leash, and when I spotted the nest, shortened it a bit so she couldn't reach it). There were a couple low swoops near her on the first pass, but then they decided to ignore her and carry on (of course, for all the chattering she does when inside, she seemed to have no interest in the birds once outside...I think she was busy trying to find out where the rabbit hides).
     
  8. Apr 25, 2009 #7
    We have a Robin and usually within ten minutes of me going into the garden he comes real close and follows me around.Because of my digging ,planting, weeding etc he is getting an easy supply of insects for his dinner.I keep telling him he's lazy and needs to do more of the work himself but he won't listen.My little friend is turning into a fat Robin.
     
  9. Apr 25, 2009 #8
    We have a few baby finches trying their best to eat seeds from my feeder. Every time I get the camera, they take off. Bright yellow, they are so cute.
    I love baby Robins too Dadface, and well yes, even big Robins.
     
  10. Apr 25, 2009 #9

    Danger

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    That's very convenient. Just flip it right-side-up, throw it on the stove, and you've got bird's-nest soup... with added protein.
     
  11. Apr 26, 2009 #10

    Moonbear

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    :yuck: I never understood why anyone would want to eat soup made out of a bird's nest. I used to think it was just a name, and when I found out that, no, it really is made with birds' nest...ick! Apparently, wren's nests are known for having lots of predatory spider nests in them...after the baby birds vacate the nest, the spiders eat the mites left behind. So, yeah, mites, spider eggs and baby bird poop...yummy!
     
  12. Apr 26, 2009 #11
    Its the salty spit from the birds that they use to hold the nest together, that they seek when making the soup. Yep, bird spit soup. Now thats good eats!:yuck:
     
  13. Apr 26, 2009 #12
    It's actually made from the nests of cave swifts, who build their nests entirely out of spit (and not just held together by spit).
     
  14. Apr 26, 2009 #13

    Danger

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    When I was working at the cowboy bar, our cooks were Chinese. There were always Chinese dishes as well as the western menu.
    One day our special was egg-drop soup. A fairly sophisticated couple came in for lunch and I seated them as usual. Unfortunately, I had a brain-fart and got confused with bird's nest soup. I therefore proudly announced that our special was 'bird-drop soup'.
    The woman's eyes got kind of big and she said 'What?!. It took me at least 10 seconds to realize what I'd said, then I couldn't stop laughing my guts out for a couple of minutes. Luckily, they were patient.
     
  15. Apr 26, 2009 #14

    Moonbear

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    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: Probably close enough. :rofl:
     
  16. Apr 28, 2009 #15

    turbo

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    We have phoebes nesting under our back deck again. Last year, I got to photograph a baby on his first real flight. Total gain in altitude - probably 1 foot from a header under the deck to just on top of it. It's parents managed to coax it into a nearby tree where they could park the baby while shuttling food to it.

    phoebechick.jpg
     
  17. Apr 28, 2009 #16
    Why didn't anyone tell me moonbear was back?
     
  18. Apr 28, 2009 #17

    chemisttree

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    Trib,
    Moonbear's back....

    Did you hear that Obama won the election?
     
  19. Apr 28, 2009 #18

    turbo

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    Shhh! She came back because she thought you were gone.






















    :devil:
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2009
  20. Apr 28, 2009 #19

    Borek

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  21. Apr 28, 2009 #20
    I just found a little humming bird stuck in the garage at work. It just keeps flying back and forth up inbetween the beams and can't figure out how to get out.
    I've tried to shoo it but its not working. Even if I could reach it would probably pop its little heart if I grabbed it.
     
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