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Bachelors in Physics.

  • Thread starter Marco12
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Well, I just finished my first semester in college, and I chose physics as my major. The question is what are my options after getting physics bachelors? I want to keep studying further physics, maybe theoretical or astrophysics. Can I do that or I have to major in astrophysics or a specific branch of physics. What do you guys suggest?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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I am going to a local University where they do not offer a major on physics and their guidance is not that good, I am just taking basics and hopefully transfer to some good physics school.
 
  • #3
fss
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If your university doesn't offer physics as a major, how did you "choose" it as you stated in your first post?
 
  • #4
I think he meant, he ''decided" to major in physics.
 
  • #5
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If your university doesn't offer physics as a major, how did you "choose" it as you stated in your first post?
Because I was undecided and then I found it they dont offer a major on physics so I will just take basics and they do offer some classes towards the major and I will take a lot of math.

Now can someone please answer my question. Thank you
 
  • #6
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Because I was undecided and then I found it they dont offer a major on physics so I will just take basics and they do offer some classes towards the major and I will take a lot of math.

Now can someone please answer my question. Thank you
So, you're not majoring in physics, got it.

You can do a variety of things with a BS in physics. The important thing to keep in mind is that you need to learn some skills that can be used in a job. This means things like programming and electronics. The usual physics curriculum does not give you too much in the way of skills that employers are looking for.

This question is asked here often enough. It shouldn't take much effort on your part to search this forum and read some of those replies.
 
  • #7
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So, you're not majoring in physics, got it.

You can do a variety of things with a BS in physics. The important thing to keep in mind is that you need to learn some skills that can be used in a job. This means things like programming and electronics. The usual physics curriculum does not give you too much in the way of skills that employers are looking for.

This question is asked here often enough. It shouldn't take much effort on your part to search this forum and read some of those replies.
I am majoring in physics, but not in the University I am attending right now. How hard is it to understand ? Well anyways thanks for the help !
 
  • #8
fss
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I am majoring in physics, but not in the University I am attending right now. How hard is it to understand ? Well anyways thanks for the help !
Apparently it's very hard, because that doesn't make any sense. I suppose it doesn't really matter where you're majoring in physics or what your situation is beyond "you are majoring in physics."

If you want to continue your physics education past undergraduate you can go into theoretical or astrophysics (or any other branch you want). What you want to do is obviously up to you, so I don't understand why you're asking us.
 
  • #9
Choppy
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There are a lot of options open to someone who completes a physics major.

If your goal is to keep studying physics then graduate school is the most common path. You don't need a "specialized" physics degree to be admitted to a particular sub field in graduate school - ie. you do not need to take a degree in undergraduate astrophysics to take on a PhD project in astrophysics. What's important at the undergraduate level is to work on the fundamentals, try to get exposure to the areas that you're interested in, and even explore some areas that you're unsure of just to be sure you don't deny yourself any opportunities.

Otherwise you enter the working world. A physics degree can be a tougher sell than, say, a professional degree in engineering, but that doesn't mean there aren't opportunities. It pays to develop some marketable skills along the way such as programming, network administration, technical group facilitation, electronics, mathematical modeling, teaching, etc, that can transfer directly into the workplace. If you explore some threads around here or poke around on the AIP website, you'll find lots of possible avenues for exploration.
 
  • #10
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There are a lot of options open to someone who completes a physics major.

If your goal is to keep studying physics then graduate school is the most common path. You don't need a "specialized" physics degree to be admitted to a particular sub field in graduate school - ie. you do not need to take a degree in undergraduate astrophysics to take on a PhD project in astrophysics. What's important at the undergraduate level is to work on the fundamentals, try to get exposure to the areas that you're interested in, and even explore some areas that you're unsure of just to be sure you don't deny yourself any opportunities.

Otherwise you enter the working world. A physics degree can be a tougher sell than, say, a professional degree in engineering, but that doesn't mean there aren't opportunities. It pays to develop some marketable skills along the way such as programming, network administration, technical group facilitation, electronics, mathematical modeling, teaching, etc, that can transfer directly into the workplace. If you explore some threads around here or poke around on the AIP website, you'll find lots of possible avenues for exploration.
Thank you, that was very informative. :)
 

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