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Back to simple algebra!

  1. Dec 15, 2012 #1
    Hello,

    Okay, after doing perhaps 1 hour of math a year for 20 years, I realize I forgot a lot!!!

    Can someone please tell what I need to do if I want to get rid of the denominator of 900 in the following expression:

    76.262 = ((124 + 30b - c)/900) + c

    Please see attachment to see exact equation...

    I am trying to find a number I can multiply 124 so that the result can be divided by 900... but I can seem to find it???

    Thanks
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 15, 2012 #2
    nevermind ... digging up my old algebra notes, I figured that I can multiply every term by 900....

    jeeeezzze,,,
     
  4. Dec 15, 2012 #3

    symbolipoint

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    The denominators shown in the equation are 1000 and 900. See the "76.262". The common factor is 233253
     
  5. Dec 15, 2012 #4
    In all due respect, where do you see 1000 as a denominator???
     
  6. Dec 15, 2012 #5
    To get rid of the 900 we could
    simply multiply all terms by 900...no?

    (900)76.262 =
    ((900*124 + 900*30b - 900*c)/900) + 900*c

    this works!!!
    thanks
     
  7. Dec 15, 2012 #6

    symbolipoint

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    Already explained in my post. It is correct, but unnecessary if you wish to maintain decimalized result.
     
  8. Dec 15, 2012 #7

    symbolipoint

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    Now that I look at the equation again, my picking at the decimal part, ".262" with denominator of 1000 plays no part in the solution. Changing the form would not be useful unless a specific application depended on it.
     
  9. Dec 15, 2012 #8
    thanks for your help...
    it is most appreciated !
     
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