• Support PF! Buy your school textbooks, materials and every day products Here!

Balmer series

  • Thread starter jubba
  • Start date
  • #1
11
0
in the balmer series the the higher energy level lines from the spectra are not observable using a spectroscope.

is this because:
they are outside the visible spectrum
and
the intensity of the lines at high energy levels are much lower than the lower energy lines?

If any of my reasons are wrong please correct me and if i have missed out something please tell me.
:rolleyes:
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
264
26
The little chart that I have shows that for terms greater than n = 6
(to n = 2, the Balmer series), the emitted radiation would fall in the ultraviolet spectrum. At n = 7 the wavelength emitted is 3970 Angstroms
and becomes progressivlely shorter for the higher terms. Hope this
answers your question.
 
  • #3
97
0
jubba said:
...of the lines at high energy levels are much lower than the lower energy lines?...
:rolleyes:
I am not sure but I think that the probablity of electron being in certain energy state depends on the temperature following the boltzman distribution. So if the electrons aren't in a higher energy state then they can't relax and emit the radiation.
 
  • #4
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
18,818
1,997
NotMrX said:
I am not sure but I think that the probablity of electron being in certain energy state depends on the temperature following the boltzman distribution. So if the electrons aren't in a higher energy state then they can't relax and emit the radiation.
Correct. The intensity which is a measure of the number of photons is related to the number of atoms which achieve a particular energy state. The highert the temperature, the more likely an atom will achieve a higher energy level through collisions. The 'color' of stars is related to temperature of the photosphere.

Balmer Series (Second) (visible light) n=2 limit = 365 nm

n=3, λ = 656 nm α, color emitted: red
n=4, λ = 486 nm β, color emitted: bluegreen
n=5, λ = 434 nm γ, color emitted: violet
n=6, λ = 410 nm δ, color emitted: violet

The remaining are UV, which would not be visible.

Lyman lines are UV and Paschen are infrared.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balmer_series
 

Related Threads on Balmer series

  • Last Post
Replies
12
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
875
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
6K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
18K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
485
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
7K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
1K
Top