Ban professional sports

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Couldn't think of a refutation for my examples?
Your examples were horrible. I simplified an action, you simplified a bunch of objects. If you had said "Music is just making noises" or "Cooking is just throwing ingredients together", it would have made some sense.

Except, you now, listening to music evokes emotions, and watching someone cook teaches you a bit about cooking. Watching someone chase a ball does what? Make your heart race? "OH SNAP!! IS HE GOING TO GET THE BALL OR IS SOMEONE ELSE GOING TO???"

And the only sport I see where people run around after a ball is soccer.
Right. Because in Basketball they just sit down and take turns holding the ball. Same in Football and Baseball. It's not like they go after whoever has the ball, and if it falls on the ground, they run after it. That never happens.
 
Your examples were horrible. I simplified an action, you simplified a bunch of objects. If you had said "Music is just making noises" or "Cooking is just throwing ingredients together", it would have made some sense.

Except, you now, listening to music evokes emotions, and watching someone cook teaches you a bit about cooking. Watching someone chase a ball does what? Make your heart race? "OH SNAP!! IS HE GOING TO GET THE BALL OR IS SOMEONE ELSE GOING TO???"
Actually watching top athletes show off their skills evokes emotion and inspiration.



Right. Because in Basketball they just sit down and take turns holding the ball. Same in Football and Baseball. It's not like they go after whoever has the ball, and if it falls on the ground, they run after it. That never happens.
There are no sports I can think of where the objective is to just "chase the ball."
 
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Go Patriots!!!
 

NateTG

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Except, you now, listening to music evokes emotions, and watching someone cook teaches you a bit about cooking. Watching someone chase a ball does what? Make your heart race? "OH SNAP!! IS HE GOING TO GET THE BALL OR IS SOMEONE ELSE GOING TO???"
Actually, people who compete do watch pro sports so they can emulate the skills and improve their game. In sports like wrestling, people also copy techniques.
 
Go Patriots!!!
Are you looking forward to Super Bowl XLII? In fact, I hope this game goes on for 12 hours just "chasing the ball." Who do you think can chase the ball better? My bet is on Randy Moss.
 
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Are you looking forward to Super Bowl XLII? In fact, I hope this game goes on for 12 hours just "chasing the ball." Who do you think can chase the ball better? My bet is on Randy Moss.
Of course I'm looking forward to the game! I want the Pats to go for a perfect season! The superbowl party that I'm going to is hosted by some of our friends that are against the Patriots. So I'm gonna paint my face and run into their door with a huge flag just for reactions :biggrin:.
 
Of course I'm looking forward to the game! I want the Pats to go for a perfect season! The superbowl party that I'm going to is hosted by some of our friends that are against the Patriots. So I'm gonna paint my face and run into their door with a huge flag just for reactions :biggrin:.
Stick a Patriots flag on their roof.
 

turbo

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I'm not a football fan by a long stretch, and only watch the Superbowl to get the quarterly scores so I can see if my wife won big bucks in her pool from work. It would be nice to see the Pats go perfect, though, just because so many of my friends and neighbors would freak! The Patriots are the nearest national franchise team, so lots of Mainers have adopted them.

You ought to ask around and see if you can borrow a tri-corner hat from some re-enactor or rent one from a costume shop. Wear that to the party - just make sure that it doesn't get stomped to little bits by grieving NY fans if Brady and Moss come through big.
 
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There are no sports I can think of where the objective is to just "chase the ball."
Lacrosse
Soccer
Football
Basketball
Baseball
Tennis
Polo
Volleyball

Are you sure you did any thinking here?

But hey, I already know what you're going to say (YOU NO CHASE BALL!!!), so I will retort with:

Oh RLY? Then how come when someone hits the ball in Baseball, people run after it?

How come when someone kicks the ball in soccer/football, people run after it?

How come when a ball comes to your side of the court in Tennis, you run after it?

The only sport that involves a ball where you don't chase it is Golf. There you casually walk after it.
 
The objective is to outscore your opponent by getting the ball into the goal.

The objective is to outscore your opponent by getting the ball into the goal. The means for doing so is probably the closest thing to saying "chasing after the ball."

The objective is to outscore your opponent by driving the football down the field and get the game ball across the end line. You don't chase after the ball at all. If you drop a pass attempt you gain nothing.

Basketball
The objective is to outscore your opponent by getting the ball into the basket which requires precision skills.

So a baserunners objective is to chase after the ball on contact? So a hitter should be running at the ball when the pitch is thrown?

Are you sure you did any thinking here?
You should be asking yourself this question.


But hey, I already know what you're going to say (YOU NO CHASE BALL!!!), so I will retort with:

Oh RLY? Then how come when someone hits the ball in Baseball, people run after it?
I'm not sure what version of baseball you're watching, but this is far from the truth.


The only sport that involves a ball where you don't chase it is Golf. There you casually walk after it.
So are we just going to ignore the basic objectives of a game and just continue to say "see...see you're not stationary so therefore you just chase after the ball!?"

I deal with this ignorance on a constant basis because people don't even bother to understand the basics of a sport before arguing against it.
 
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So nobody goes after the ball in any of those sports is what you are saying?

Like, when Basket Player X has the ball, the other team doesn't try to get it back?
 
So nobody goes after the ball in any of those sports is what you are saying?

Like, when Basket Player X has the ball, the other team doesn't try to get it back?
Yes, you're right. The other team wants to be in possession of the ball so they can score, and ultimately outscore their opponents. But the means for doing so is different in each sport so each sport has a different skill set. Of course there's some form of running involved. I don't know of a sport which requires remaining stationary. However, you simply took this and equated it as sports= chasing after a ball, which is simply an ignorant statement to make.
 
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But at the very core, that's what you do. When the ball is on the ground, lying there, people are running for it. That's running after the ball. When some guy grabs the ball, everybody else now runs after him, to get the ball. That's still chasing the ball.
 
But at the very core, that's what you do. When the ball is on the ground, lying there, people are running for it. That's running after the ball. When some guy grabs the ball, everybody else now runs after him, to get the ball. That's still chasing the ball.
I wouldn't define it as such because that omits a lot of events and would confuse someone trying to learn a sport. I would define it more as the defense trying to "stagnate/hinder ball movement" and ultimately reverse ball movement in their favor. While the offense is trying to progress ball movement. Baseball is a little bit different in terms as the pitcher is trying to reduce contact and reduce advancement of baserunners while the batter is trying to increase contact and advance bases and baserunners to ultimately score a run.
 

Moonbear

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But the means for doing so is different in each sport so each sport has a different skill set.
The problem I have is that there is ZERO skill required to sit on a couch and watch a game on TV. That's the part I don't understand. I can certainly understand people going out and playing the sport, I can even understand having your mom show up to the game to cheer for you, it can be fun to play, good exercise, develops skills like hand-eye coordination, promotes socialization and teamwork, etc., but I cannot understand what is so fun about watching someone else play a game, or why anyone gets so worked up about it to the point of increasing their cardiovascular risk (the subject of the OP). If that's what you enjoy for entertainment, then fine, whatever floats your boat, but it seems ridiculous if it gets to the point where people are having heart attacks over it (though, not having read the full article in the OP, I wonder if it's necessarily the game itself, or all the drinking and junk food eating).
 
The problem I have is that there is ZERO skill required to sit on a couch and watch a game on TV. That's the part I don't understand. I can certainly understand people going out and playing the sport, I can even understand having your mom show up to the game to cheer for you, it can be fun to play, good exercise, develops skills like hand-eye coordination, promotes socialization and teamwork, etc., but I cannot understand what is so fun about watching someone else play a game, or why anyone gets so worked up about it to the point of increasing their cardiovascular risk (the subject of the OP).
Well why do you watch a musician perform? Because you enjoy the act of them showcasing their musical skill set in the form of songs. It's the same with watching sports. Because you enjoy the act of top athletes showcasing their physical skill set in the form of games. I'm not the one to get worked up over a game, unless it's an elimination game in the postseason of course :-D. For example, I know that one game of a baseball regular season is less than 1% of the total season so one loss by my favorite franchise isn't going to stress me out as a fan.

Now this doesn't apply to every sports fan, but there are a lot of sports fans out there who also watch for the statistical analysis aspect of the game. There's a lot of math and physics you can learn just by analyzing a sport, and I don't think anyone would disagree with me saying that can be beneficial.

I do want to mention the strategy aspect also. There's a lot of strategy involved in progressing or stagnating ball movement.
 

Ivan Seeking

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I don't know how much this sort of thing goes on now, but when I played football, during hell week we had to do our daily 8 hours in full gear. The day often concluded with us running, often in 90 degree temps, until we threw up or passed out. I think maybe two or three people could actually finish the run without dropping.

My guess is that this was not really good. But God help yuh, a real man will try his damnest to finish, even if it kills him.
 

Moonbear

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Well why do you watch a musician perform? Because you enjoy the act of them showcasing their musical skill set in the form of songs.
Well, I really don't care to watch musicians perform either. I enjoy listening to music, mostly when I can sing along (whether or not anyone else enjoys that, I won't say) but could care less about the person performing it, and I'm certainly not jumping up and down giving myself a heart attack over their performance.

Now this doesn't apply to every sports fan, but there are a lot of sports fans out there who also watch for the statistical analysis aspect of the game. There's a lot of math and physics you can learn just by analyzing a sport, and I don't think anyone would disagree with me saying that can be beneficial.
That seems to be quite a reach. I don't think your average beer-guzzling, nacho consuming football fan is thinking about statistics or physics when they're screaming at the TV.

I do want to mention the strategy aspect also. There's a lot of strategy involved in progressing or stagnating ball movement.
Again, a good thing to learn IF you're the one playing. But if someone is just sitting on a sofa, there's no strategy for them other than seeing what the strategy was after-the-fact.

But, I'm not saying don't watch sports or anything like that. If it's fun for you, go ahead and enjoy it. It's not fun for me, but then I enjoy going to art museums and looking at pretty pictures I didn't paint and you might not. On the other hand, I'm not having a heart attack getting myself worked up over whether or not Jackson Pollock's splatters are or are not art (about the biggest argument I've seen recently break out among art fans).
 

Ivan Seeking

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On CNN they just reported the results of a poll that asks: Are you more excited about the Super Bowl, or Super Tuesday.

Super B 40%
Super T 37%
Neither 22%

They should have followed-up by asking which one matters the most.
 

Ivan Seeking

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The fact that Congress actually stepped in to address the drug problem in baseball because of the effect that it was having on teenagers who were emulating their paper heros [some died], it is difficult, no, impossible to argue that sports have an entirely positive influence, even when people are participating directly.
 
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Now this doesn't apply to every sports fan, but there are a lot of sports fans out there who also watch for the statistical analysis aspect of the game. There's a lot of math and physics you can learn just by analyzing a sport, and I don't think anyone would disagree with me saying that can be beneficial.
I'm sorry. Did you actually type this with a straight face?
 

Ivan Seeking

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As a coach of nine years at Nevada Union High School and a general sport enthusiast, I am dismayed at the state of affairs in sports today.

You can't turn on ESPN or the nightly news without hearing about the latest star vehemently denying any wrong doing, only to confess down the line that their medals, their records, their very star power was one of ill repute.

And when caught they still try to make excuses, shift the blame, even accuse others to help water down their offense.

The scene is the same in every sport with just about every type of drug, but by the time they become professionals it is generally some sort of performance-enhancing drug. Then there are the brawls, and the cheating that's not only accepted, but encouraged.

And what are these athletes punishment for their offenses? Not much. [continued]
http://www.theunion.com/article/20080201/SPORTS/425073288
 
That seems to be quite a reach. I don't think your average beer-guzzling, nacho consuming football fan is thinking about statistics or physics when they're screaming at the TV.
I'm not talking about those morons. I despise them as much as you do. They aren't real sports fans in my opinion.


Again, a good thing to learn IF you're the one playing. But if someone is just sitting on a sofa, there's no strategy for them other than seeing what the strategy was after-the-fact.

There are a lot of great websites out there that have some good stuff on strategy backed up with statistical analysis. It definately gives your brain a good workout. I'm sure your view of the sports fan would change drastically if you read up on this and make you realize that not all of us just sit there and blindly watch games in a daze.
 
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Now this doesn't apply to every sports fan, but there are a lot of sports fans out there who also watch for the statistical analysis aspect of the game. There's a lot of math and physics you can learn just by analyzing a sport, and I don't think anyone would disagree with me saying that can be beneficial.
But the other 99.9999% wants bragging rights.
 

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