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Base 10?

  1. Jun 22, 2010 #1
    Hello! I was just wondering why the most common base is base 10? It seems kind of arbitrary to me, although I may be overlooking something.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 22, 2010 #2

    Integral

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    Counting your thumbs, how many fingers do you have?
     
  4. Jun 22, 2010 #3
    Haha! Duh! Ok, thanks!
     
  5. Jun 22, 2010 #4

    Mark44

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    Other bases have been used over time, such as 12, 20, 60, 360.

    Base 12 is convenient to use because it can be divided evenly by 2, 3, 4, and 6, so many fractional amounts of 12 things come out as whole numbers. We buy eggs by the dozen and count (in the US) 12 inches to the foot. A gross of things is 144 of them, or 12 dozen.

    Base 20 is nearly as obvious as base 10 (counting toes and fingers). I believe that the French word for 80, quatre vingt (4 twenty), might be a remnant of base-20 counting.

    Base 60 is still present in the number of seconds in a minute or minutes in an hour or degree. 60 has the advantage of being divisible by 10 or 20 as well as 12.

    Base 360 - the number of degrees in a full circle. If my memory is correct, the Babylonians counted numbers using this base.

    Other bases -- base 2, base 8, base 16 -- are more modern, and stem from computer technology, with transistors able to attain one of two possible states. A single bit in memory can be either 1 or 0, corresponding in some way to a high voltage or a low voltage. The binary digits are 0 and 1.

    If you collect three bits together, you can represent any of eight numbers: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7, the octal digits. If you collect four bits together, you can represent any of 16 different numbers: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, A, B, C, D, E, F. These are the hexadecimal digits.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2018
  6. Jun 22, 2010 #5

    Office_Shredder

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    I always knew there was something a little funny about the French
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 9, 2018
  7. Jun 22, 2010 #6
    This is the prevailing answer, but it always leaves me unsatisfied. Personally, I think base 6 is the better match: the right hand is the 1s place, and the left hand is the 6s place.
     
  8. Jun 22, 2010 #7
    80 is quatrevingt (4 twenties, or 4x20). 60 is soixante. & I think another common base is hexadecimal (base 16) & I guess there's binary also (base 2), but everyone knows about that one
     
  9. Jun 22, 2010 #8

    DaveC426913

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    I wonder if any societies have ever had a base 21 counting system... :rolleyes:
     
  10. Jun 22, 2010 #9

    HallsofIvy

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    I have read that the Kwakiutle Indians of the Pacific north west counted using the spaces between the fingers. Although their's was not a "place value" numeration system, it was based on "4" rather than "5" or "10".
     
  11. Jun 22, 2010 #10

    Office_Shredder

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    Apparently the Mayans had a base 20 system

    I feel like by the time placeholders were invented, either a base was set already or a base was picked on needs other than the ability to count on your hand
     
  12. Jun 22, 2010 #11

    CRGreathouse

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    Base 6 is extremely uncommon, though -- base 10, base 20, base 5, base 100, base 12, base 60, and base 4 are all more common in natural languages. Actually, I can't think of a single example.
     
  13. Jun 22, 2010 #12
    When I want to hide a number in plain sight I use base 9 but then add random 9's and simply ignore them.
     
  14. Jun 23, 2010 #13
    I don't know of any examples either; it just seems natural to me. Of course, I'm looking at this in hindsight with zero and place value at my disposal.
     
  15. Jun 25, 2010 #14
    That's a fantastic idea! Do you do the conversion in your head? With octal you could just use a calculator...
     
  16. Jun 25, 2010 #15
    The real reason is if a number is in any base it's in base 10.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2010
  17. Jun 25, 2010 #16
    What does this mean? Are you speaking binary?
     
  18. Jun 25, 2010 #17
    Binary, ternary, hex - whatever. If you store the binary number base (two) and print it out in binary it comes out as 10. If you store the hex number base (sixteen) and print it out in hex it comes out as 10. Same for any other base. The base is always 10.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2010
  19. Jun 25, 2010 #18

    DaveC426913

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    Heh. I'd never thought of it that way.


    There is, of course, a single exception - and a commonly used one at that (people use it a lot when playing cards): base 1.

    i.e.:
    ||||| |||||
    ||||| |||

    Base 1 is simply: base 1.
     
  20. Jun 25, 2010 #19

    Mark44

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    I don't think counting by tickmarks really counts as "base 1." Base 1 doesn't follow the consistent pattern that is present in other bases such as base 2, 3, 8, 10, 16, etc. In base 2, there are 2 binary digits, 0 and 1. In base 3, there are three ternary digits, 0, 1, and 2. If we're counting in base a, the digits go from 0 up through a - 1.

    Following the same logic, in base 1, the only digit would be 0, which makes counting pretty difficult.
     
  21. Jun 25, 2010 #20

    DaveC426913

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    That's not the pattern though. You're looking a the wrong part for significance.

    We use 0 and 1 by convention as the first two symbols in our numeral system. In base 1, we can use tickmarks, but it doesn't matter what the symbol is as long as we know what it represents - which is why it can just as easily be 1 - or 0.

    The important pattern this:
    - we start counting with our list of symbols
    - when we use up all our symbols we start a new column, and resume counting

    So:

    base 3:
    0,1,2, (add a new column, keep going) 10,11,12,20,21,22, (new column) 100, etc.
    Here it is with different symbols:
    a,b,c,ba,bb,bc,ca,cb,cc, baa, etc.

    base 2:
    0,1 (add a new column, keep going) 10,11, (again) 100,101, etc.
    Again, with different symbols:
    a,b,ba,bb,baa,bab, etc.

    base 1:
    1, (add a new column, keep going) 11, (again), 111, etc.
    Again, with different symbols:
    a, aa, aaa, etc.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2010
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