Basic circuit question

  • Thread starter airkapp
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Circuit
In summary, the speaker is seeking help to determine the Thevenin equivalent circuit and the load resistance for maximum power transfer in the attached circuit. They are unsure of how to use the Thevenin theorem and have added a resistor in series and parallel to get an "R equivalence" of 15 ohms. They are unsure if this is correct and need assistance in finding the load resistance for maximum power transfer.
  • #1
58
0
I'm trying to determine the Thevenin equivalent circuit for the attached circuit. Also, the value of the load resistance R load for maximum power transfer. I'm not to sure how exactly the Thevenin theorem operates but I simply added my resistor in series and parallel (where appropriate). I suppose that gave me "R equivalence" which equaled 15 ohms. Not sure if that is correct after shorting out the voltages and open the currents (zeroing out). Can someone help figure the "load resistance for max. power transfer?" I'm attaching the diagram here.

thanks,
air
 

Attachments

  • RLOAD Circuit.doc
    58 KB · Views: 178
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Not sure if that is correct after shorting out the voltages and open the currents (zeroing out).
I'm quiet sure it's the other way around, shorting out the current and setting voltage to 0... that means no current passes through the 15 ohm-resistor.
 
  • #3


The Thevenin theorem is a useful tool for simplifying complex circuits and determining the equivalent circuit. To determine the Thevenin equivalent circuit, you need to short out all voltage sources and open all current sources. This will leave you with a simplified circuit consisting of only resistors. The equivalent resistance, or R equivalence, is then calculated by adding resistors in series and parallel as you have done.

To find the load resistance for maximum power transfer, you can use the formula R load = R equivalence. This means that in your circuit, the load resistance should also be 15 ohms for maximum power transfer. This is because when the load resistance is equal to the equivalent resistance, the maximum amount of power is transferred from the source to the load.

I would also recommend checking your calculations and circuit diagram to ensure everything is correct. You can also use simulation software to verify your results. I hope this helps and good luck with your circuit analysis!
 

1. What is a basic circuit?

A basic circuit is a closed loop or pathway through which electricity or current can flow. It typically consists of a power source, conductors (such as wires), and components (such as resistors, capacitors, and switches) connected in a specific way to allow the flow of electricity.

2. How does electricity flow in a circuit?

Electricity flows in a circuit due to the movement of electrons. When a power source, such as a battery, is connected to a circuit, it creates an electric field that causes electrons to move from the negative terminal of the battery to the positive terminal. This flow of electrons is known as current.

3. What is the difference between series and parallel circuits?

In a series circuit, all components are connected in a single loop and the current flows through each component in succession. In a parallel circuit, the components are connected in multiple branches and the current splits to flow through each branch simultaneously.

4. How do resistors affect a circuit?

Resistors are components that limit the flow of current in a circuit. They are used to control the amount of current that flows through a circuit and to reduce the risk of overheating or damaging other components. The resistance of a resistor is measured in ohms and the higher the resistance, the less current will flow through the circuit.

5. How do you calculate the total resistance in a series or parallel circuit?

In a series circuit, the total resistance is equal to the sum of the individual resistances. For example, if there are three resistors with values of 10 ohms, 20 ohms, and 30 ohms, the total resistance would be 10 + 20 + 30 = 60 ohms. In a parallel circuit, the total resistance is calculated by taking the reciprocal of each individual resistance and adding them together, then taking the reciprocal of the sum. Using the same example, the total resistance would be 1/10 + 1/20 + 1/30 = 0.0333 ohms, and then taking the reciprocal of 0.0333 to get 30 ohms.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
776
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
2
Replies
42
Views
563
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
152
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
457
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
375
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
441
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
455
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
444
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
130
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
122
Back
Top