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Basic Physics Questions

  1. Jan 17, 2017 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    So we are given a group of numbers and just wants us to answer some questions. Pretty sure I got it right just want to confirm since we only get one attempt at submitting it.
    1) 150+.0005cm
    2) 150 + 1cm
    3) 65 + 10cm
    4) 170 + 10cm

    a) which one is most precise?
    b) Which one is most accurate? (True height is 165)
    C) does NOT have a reasonable uncertainty? (using millimeters)
    d) Which one has experienced blunder?
    2. Relevant equations
    N/A

    3. The attempt at a solution
    A) Would be #1 because it has the most significant figures
    B) Would be #1 also because it's a difference of 14.99995 where as 4 is 15
    C)No idea guessing #2 because it was only on that seamed unreasonable compared to the rest
    d) Obvious 3 because it's not even close to the rest

    Thanks for checking these!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 17, 2017 #2

    haruspex

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    Homework Helper
    Gold Member
    2016 Award

    Not certain, but I think the "using mm" means that the measuring instrument used only had a precision down to the nearest mm. You might want to reconsider your answer.

    By the way, are the plus signs all supposed to be ±?
     
  4. Jan 17, 2017 #3

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    You did not fill out the Relevant Equations section of the Template, but it is important for you to do that. Consider it the "Relevant Equations and Concepts" part of the Template. What is the definition of precision? Of accuracy? Of uncertainty? And why did you offer the answers that you did? Please give us more, so we can help you better with your leaning and schoolwork. Thanks :smile:
     
  5. Jan 18, 2017 #4

    mfb

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    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    Assuming the "+" are supposed to be ±: Check that answer as well.
     
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