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Basic Stoichiometry

  1. Jan 21, 2005 #1
    How many moles of [itex]H_{2}O_{(g)}[/itex] are produced when 9.6 mol of [itex]0_{2}_{(g)}[/itex] react?
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 21, 2005 #2
    [tex]O_{2 (g)} \rightarrow H_2 O_{(g)}[/tex] is what you know so to balance (using x as unknowns) [tex]xH_{2(g)} + O_{2 (g)} \rightarrow xH_2 O_{(g)}[/tex]
    Now after the simple balancing apply what you know from the question so that (y being the value you should know): [tex]x_2 H_{2(g)} + y O_{2 (g)} \rightarrow x_2 H_2 O_{(g)}[/tex]

    I think that is the idea but someone might say otherwise.

    Hope it helps.

    The Bob (2004 ©)

    EDIT: I removed the answer so that the original poster could try and solve it themselves. Sorry Gokul43201. :frown:
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2005
  4. Jan 21, 2005 #3
    You may want to explicity say where the coefficent of the hydrogen came from.
  5. Jan 21, 2005 #4


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    And if i may ask,why would he do that???I think it's pretty obvious where & why that 19.2 came from...

  6. Jan 21, 2005 #5
    Sorry sorry everyone. I know that was a stupid question. It's just the answer they gave was wrong.

    Anyway it's [tex]9.6 mol O_{2} * 2 mol of H_{2}O over 1 mol of O_{2}[/tex]
    Which came to [tex]19 mol[/tex] with sig figs.

    Sorry again. :/
  7. Jan 22, 2005 #6
    Why not have 19.2 moles?? It is more accurate. Significant figures will do very little to the answer.

    The Bob (2004 ©)
  8. Jan 22, 2005 #7
    Because our teacher is anal like that.
  9. Jan 22, 2005 #8
    I see. I do hate teachers like that.

    The Bob (2004 ©)
  10. Jan 23, 2005 #9
    The teacher is, nevertheless, correct. The value of 9.6 was given to two significant figures in the question, so the answer must be rounded to the same to represent the maximum certainty of the answer.
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