Beauty of old electrical and measuring things, etc.

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  • #426
dlgoff
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sold it to a laser enthusiast
:approve:
 
  • #427
dlgoff
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No. Not enough He.

edit: However, the same tube type in this laser does work.

View attachment 249761
What good is a laser without demonstrating single slit diffraction? So I went to ebay and bought this (pics from ebay) Gaertner Scientific Adjustable Optical Slit on a Newport (NRC) optical breadboard mount (Newport B-2 base and VPH-4 mount):
optical slit 1.jpg

optical slit 2.jpg


After cleaning it up and polishinng & realigning the slit edges, I made a receiving screen and made some interference patterns.

diffraction screen.jpg


diffraction pattern.gif


Now IMO, that's beauty.
 
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  • #428
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I don't know whether my stuffs are considered old, I am cheap, other than I paid top $$ for my soldering irons, my scope, pulse gen, signal gen etc. are all old stuffs. My scope is an old Tektronixs 2465A 350MHz analog scope I bought for $400, my Pulse gen is HP old one that is at least 30 years old and I use an old Wavetech signal generator. All bought cheap.

There's nothing wrong with using old test equipment as long as it can do the job. I worked for a company that we always run on a shoe string budget ( and proud of it). They don't even have better equipment than me at home!!! We got the job done gloriously, went through IPO and all.
 
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  • #429
dlgoff
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My scope is an old Tektronixs 2465A 350MHz analog scope I bought for $400, my Pulse gen is HP old one that is at least 30 years old and I use an old Wavetech signal generator.
Sounds old enough to be worthy of some photographs. Hint, Hint :oldshy:

There's nothing wrong with using old test equipment as long as it can do the job. ... We got the job done gloriously, went through IPO and all.
Well there you go. Proof positive.
 
  • #430
dlgoff
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As a result of this not keeping my electrodes cool enough, I bought this early model Neslab Instruments refrigerated circulating bath.

Neslab 9B.jpg


A useful beauty indeed.
 
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  • #431
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I've been mostly absent from PF rebuilding a Maytag, Inc. (originally, The Maytag Washing Machine Company) two cylinder model 72 Hit-and-miss engine. It had been out-doors and full of rain water. But after two cans of WD-40 penetrating oil and two bottles of Naval Jelly rust dissolver, I was able to take the thing apart, clean, and paint. I purchased a gasket set, a piston ring set, and a muffler then reassembled. Here are some pictures of the finished project.

front.jpg

back.jpg

top.jpg


And since this is the Electrical Engineering forum, a look inside the magneto (flywheel with magnets removed).

magneto.jpg


As soon as the weather is better, I'm taking the engine outside and starting it; hopefully.
 
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  • #432
anorlunda
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Wow, that looks like a beautiful restoration. Recently I found the Youtube channel called My Mechanics from Switzerland. He makes restoration project videos. He does beautiful work and that looks like a great hobby. It is certainly relaxing to watch the videos.
 
  • #433
dlgoff
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After posting a reply to @Evo 's comment in the COVID-19 Coronavirus Containment Efforts thread:
Today I went to the store and there were NO EGGS! NONE! Who hordes eggs???
got me thinking of the time needed to grade a gross of eggs with this Mascot Egg Grading Scale "balance":

IMG_3215.JPG


I haven't researched much about it's history and I won't be trying to restore it, but here's a .gif showing how it works:

Mascot Egg Grading.gif


I am surprised that the grading scale appears to be a metal photo.
 
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  • #434
dlgoff
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Here are a couple oilers manufactured by Lube Devices in Manitowoc, Wisconsin (@Greg Bernhardt 's alma mater state).

oilers.jpg

oiler-1.jpg

oiler-2.jpg
 
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  • #435
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I've been mostly absent from PF rebuilding a Maytag, Inc. (originally, The Maytag Washing Machine Company) two cylinder model 72 Hit-and-miss engine. It had been out-doors and full of rain water. But after two cans of WD-40 penetrating oil and two bottles of Naval Jelly rust dissolver, I was able to take the thing apart, clean, and paint. I purchased a gasket set, a piston ring set, and a muffler then reassembled. Here are some pictures of the finished project.

....

As soon as the weather is better, I'm taking the engine outside and starting it; hopefully.
Wow! I was unaware there were gas engine powered washing machines, and surprised that Maytag made their own engines. According to this source, it was 5/8 HP, and I saw a link to a back-pack mount, apparently for the Military (probably used it to recharge batteries for radios?).

Had a chance to start it?

I had a chance to chat with a guy displaying his antique hit-miss engine at a farm show a few years back. I'd seen these demonstrated before, and I always figured they just ran really poorly :). The guy explained how the governor would just keep the valve (exhaust I think) closed (open?) when it hit top speed. So with no load it only had to hit once or twice in about every 5 or 6 cycles to maintain speed, so it sounded something like "rump-rump-whoosh-whoosh-whoosh-whoosh-whoosh-rump-whoosh-whoosh-whoosh-rump". Then he loaded it down for me so I could hear it fire every cycle. Pretty cool!
 
  • #436
dlgoff
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It's been a while since posting anything that measures but while playing around with a blue LED and a ultrasonic humidifier I came up with this video (blur fire) honoring Shuji Nakamura, Isamu Akasaki, and Hiroshi Amano for their invention that won them the 2014 Nobel Prize for physics.

blur fire.gif
 
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  • #437
Janus
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@dlgoff 's post reminded me of some pictures I took in an antique shop a while back. They had some old equipment that had been converted into lamps:
oldelec1.jpg


oldelec2.jpg


oldelec3.jpg


oldelec4.jpg
 
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  • #438
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  • #439
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Curious; where was the antique shop?
McMinnville, OR.
 
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  • #440
dlgoff
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I came across this RCA scanner radio. I had no idea RCA made a scanner:

small IMG_3341.gif


small IMG_3344.gif
 
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  • #441
berkeman
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Any idea what channels it's set up to scan? Does it have one crystal per channel?
 
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dlgoff
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Any idea what channels it's set up to scan? Does it have one crystal per channel?
I haven't opened it to check what frequencies the crystals are, but @Averagesupernova did the research, thanks @Averagesupernova. Unfortunately I get a error 1020 while trying to go to the site. What I find interesting is that it has two antenna jack connectors; one for UHF and one for VHF. I've been hunting for a couple old auto antennas that should work by adjusting their lengths.
 
  • #444
dlgoff
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Any idea what channels it's set up to scan? Does it have one crystal per channel?
here is what's printed on the crystals:
1) 460.250
2) 460.350
3) 460.400
4) 460.475
5) 39.5800
6) 44.8200
7) 44.980
8) 154.430
9) 154.680
10) 162.475

I'm assuming 1-4 are kHz and 5-10 are MHz? What do you think?
 
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  • #445
Averagesupernova
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They are all MHz.
 
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  • #446
dlgoff
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Here's some other non-electrical beauties. Some really old Hot Wheels die-cast toys that's been waiting to be displayed.
smallIMG_3384-2.jpg

I'm working on a couple electrical beauties coming up next.
 
  • #447
dlgoff
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I thought this scanner was so neat that I decided to purchase another one; this one with it's antennas.
PF RCA-1-rot.jpg
 
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With the recent ice storm in Texas I started thinking about how reliant we are on cell phone tech over the good old radio transceiver tech.

Especially when the 4 min 37 secs story broke, generators fail, cell towers go dead and battery operated radios are still in play but are they still in use in the field with electrical crews?

Thanks for sharing this.
 
  • #449
dlgoff
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battery operated radios are still in play ...
In this case, this is one is powered by 115VAC.
 
  • #450
DaveE
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Hi-tech instrument design circa 1960's.

20210207_155201.jpg
 
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