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BEC on a planet

  1. Feb 23, 2006 #1
    If there was a planet and there was no real energy source near it (say like our sun) would a few stars around 100million light years away on all sides of the planet(like our stars) be enought to keep atoms on the planet moving enough to stop BEC, or would BEC occur. Also if there was only one star, then would BEC also be occuring on the other side (that is if one star is enough to stop BEC on the side its shining on) Please give a good explanantion as to why.
     
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  3. Feb 23, 2006 #2

    ZapperZ

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    Er... back up a bit.

    What do "moving", another star, or "energy source" have anything to do with the formation of BEC? You do know that superfluids and supercurrent, by their definitions, are "moving" entities, and that these things need not occur at temperatures where everything stop moving, don't you?

    Zz.
     
  4. Feb 26, 2006 #3
    BEC's don't form at temperatures naturally like that. In order for a BEC to for you would need either a very unusual phenomenon or for human interaction. Space doesn't get cold enough to form a BEC, so therefore it wouldn't form anywhere in space naturally. Though in some quark stars, neutron stars, and other unusual situtations they have been theorized to be.
     
  5. Mar 11, 2006 #4
    This thread started me thinking that a huge Nebula of Hydrogen, Helium or Nitrogen could be in some areas a Super cooling System, It got me thinking that some of the Nebulas might contain Activated Super Conductive Material Naturally if the conditions were right and in such a huge system the chances should be great I would think.

    A Nebula Storm of Nitrogen at say a 1000 miles an hour would be chilly Willy.

    Thanks for making things click.:bugeye:
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2006
  6. Mar 11, 2006 #5

    ZapperZ

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    If this thread made you think of such things, then you have a vivid imagination based on what wasn't even said. I don't think this thread can take such "credit".

    Zz.
     
  7. Mar 11, 2006 #6
    BEC wouldn't work in space because it is a few degrees above absolute zero, do to the radiation left behind form the big bang. BEC occurs when it is less than a few billionths of a degree above absolute zero.
     
  8. Mar 11, 2006 #7

    ZapperZ

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    This isn't true.

    There are MANY forms of BEC. What you are refering to is BEC in atomic gas. But do not forget that a superconductor contains condensed cooper pair, which are composite bosons in a BEC. You also have superfluid He4 and He3 in a BEC, and those occur not at that low of a temperature either (certainly not a few billionths of a degree above absolute zero).

    So the argument against the OP here isn't the "temperature" but rather the "mechanism" for such a formation.

    Zz.
     
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