Becoming a patron at a college library?

  • Thread starter pentazoid
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In summary, at most elite college libraries, becoming a patron without being a student is not prohibitively expensive, but at MIT library, it costs $500 a year.
  • #1
pentazoid
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Do you have to be a student at MIT or Stanford , in order to check out books from therir liibrary or can you become a patron without being a student?
 
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  • #3
That if people can give you a job, they sure can get it away from you. If someone can go into one of those good schools, he can also be kicked out of it. Just time let's you know it
 
  • #4
Here's MIT's user policies:
http://libraries.mit.edu/groups/visitors/users.html

Again.. google is amazingly quick.
 
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  • #5
physics girl phd said:
Here's MIT's user policies:
http://libraries.mit.edu/groups/visitors/users.html

Again.. google is amazingly quick.

$500 a year??! Its not like there is a waiting list for people to become patrons at MIT library, why so expensive? Is that the price range to become a patron at most elite college Libraries like MIT? At my school, it only cost $50 a year to be a patron, and you are still allowed interlibrary loan privileges.
 
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  • #6
pentazoid said:
$500 a year??! Its not like there is a waiting list for people to become patrons at MIT library, why so expensive? Is that the price range to become a patron at most elite college Libraries like MIT? At my school, it only cost $50 a year to be a patron, and you are still allowed interlibrary loan privileges.
What's dumb is that the page also says that if you have a Boston Public Library card, you can check out books from MIT. But I'd assume that the costs of getting a public library card are quite low, and that practically anyone who lives in the area can get one.
 
  • #7
Screw checking out books, I would be more interested in journal access. I don't know what I'm going to do after I graduate.
 

Related to Becoming a patron at a college library?

1. What are the benefits of becoming a patron at a college library?

As a patron of a college library, you will have access to a wide range of resources and services to support your academic pursuits. This includes access to physical and online collections of books, journals, and databases, as well as borrowing privileges, research assistance, and study spaces.

2. How do I become a patron at a college library?

To become a patron at a college library, you usually need to be affiliated with the college as a student, faculty member, or staff. You will need to provide proof of your affiliation, such as a student or employee ID, and fill out an application form. Some colleges may also offer community memberships for non-affiliated individuals.

3. Are there any fees associated with becoming a patron at a college library?

Most college libraries do not charge fees for becoming a patron. However, there may be fees for certain services, such as printing and photocopying, and for overdue or lost materials. It is best to check with your specific college library for their policies on fees.

4. What are the rules and regulations for patrons at a college library?

Each college library may have different rules and regulations for patrons, so it is important to familiarize yourself with them. Some common rules include keeping noise levels to a minimum, not bringing food or drinks into the library, and returning borrowed materials on time. Violating these rules may result in penalties, such as fines or temporary suspension of library privileges.

5. Can I access the college library's resources remotely as a patron?

Many college libraries offer remote access to their online resources for their patrons. This means that you can access eBooks, eJournals, and databases from off-campus using your library login credentials. However, there may be limitations on the number of simultaneous users for certain resources, so it is important to check with your college library for their remote access policies.

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