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Beginer book

  1. Dec 11, 2007 #1
    I am still in high school taking a Physics class and honestly the book the school gave us just shows you example problems. So I was wondering if you guys knew of any good Beginning Physics books that would be good and have a lot more explanation.

    All we have done so far is learned about vectors, momentum, impulse, and a few formulas about distance, velocity, and acceleration.

    Our teacher doesn't really teach us so i am looking for a book with A LOT of EXPLANATION so that even I can understand this stuff

    Thank you
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 12, 2008 #2
    I am in the same situation. I plan to order http://www.amazon.com/000-Solved-Pr...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1202848510&sr=1-1
    for problem solving and see what i can do. I just use my school's physics book for the basic explanation; however, I am planning to buy another book about basic physics to fill in the gaps that my other physics book left behind.

    Any recommendations?

    Looks like we are the only high school students on this site.. lol
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2008
  4. Feb 12, 2008 #3
    Basic Physics: A Self-Teaching Guide by Karl F. Kuhn is pretty good for algebra based physics, which is probably what you're taking in high school.
  5. Feb 28, 2008 #4
    Look for
    "Physics for Scientists and engineerings" 6th edition.. there are two volumes to this
    those books are really good.. the cover is blue
  6. Mar 10, 2008 #5
    I'm trying to figure out what will supplement my knowledge. So far, i'm looking at these books(in order of preference) :
    1.Introductory Physics with Algebra as a Second Language: Mastering Problem-Solving
    2.Thinking Physics: Understandable Practical Reality
    3.Basic Physics: A Self-Teaching Guide

    I might order the first and second book, but i'm not sure. The self-teaching guide(3) just asserts the formula and makes you memorize it without figuring out how they derived it. I can't see why people like the self-teaching guide so much.. i read the first few pages..

    I'm looking for a detailed and a comprehensive intro to physics to supplement my Holt Physics textbook by Serway and Faughin

    How about those Schaums?

    Is it a good choice to buy 1 and 2?
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2008
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