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Bell inequality and gravity

  1. Jun 29, 2004 #1
    When a photon's spin is measured, the photon must exert a force on the device that measures its spin.Since a force is associated with an acceleration and an acceleration with gravity,could the photon have created a gravity wave that travels through space and determines the spin of a second photon coupled to it?
     
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  3. Jun 29, 2004 #2

    LURCH

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    It would appear that this model would show a link between gravitons and entanglement. If gravitons are at all what we think they are, they travel at lightspeed, so this link should eb impossible.
     
  4. Jun 29, 2004 #3
    LURCH:

    It would appear that this model would show a link between gravitons and entanglement. If gravitons are at all what we think they are, they travel at lightspeed, so this link should eb impossible.

    Kurious:

    Then let the gravitational force carrier move faster than light.If it did then its wavelength would be greater than LIGO experimentalists expect and that could be why they haven't detected any gravitational waves so far.
     
  5. Jun 29, 2004 #4
    i don't think the speed of gravity waves would matter to a detector would it? there are alot better reasons why we haven't detected gravity waves besides...
     
  6. Jun 29, 2004 #5
    The amplitude of a faster wave would be smaller- it would matter to LIGO detectors.
     
  7. Jun 29, 2004 #6
    I would think that gravity waves travel at c or maybe a little less because if gravity waves travel faster than c then it would be possible to send information faster than the speed of light. Just have a device that reads the gravitational pull excerted by another object far away. Move the object accordingly and the detector can pick up its movement by changes in the gravitational pull exerted on it. But who knows.
     
  8. Jun 29, 2004 #7
    The idea of information travelling faster than light is why I started thinking about gravity doing so.Gravity is still a poorly understood phenomenon and
    every particle in the universe is associated with it and so could communicate quickly with it.
     
  9. Jun 29, 2004 #8
    Kip Thorne's Window on the universe has given us a lot to consider about gravitational waves. I was looking for a panel in particular that I will have to place another time

    http://astrosun2.astro.cornell.edu/academics/courses//astro201/images/bin_puls.gif

    The Daisey Scroll down immediately when page is opened
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2004
  10. Jun 30, 2004 #9

    DrChinese

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    Bell has nothing to do with gravity. You cannot derive any kind of link with gravity from Bell, period. Regardless of the nature of the hypothetical root of the 2 photons' spin, it cannot be local realistic. That is all Bell says.

    QM separately says that photon spin is not tied to gravity. So you would have to come up with some pretty fancy footwork to create a theory that couples photon spin to gravity given the experimental evidence in support of QM.
     
  11. Jun 30, 2004 #10
    DR CHINESE:

    Bell has nothing to do with gravity. You cannot derive any kind of link with gravity from Bell, period

    Kurious:
    Every particle in the universe exists in a gravitational field.
    The Bell experiments take place in a gravitational field wherever they can be possibly done.There has to be a link!
    And who said that the photon's spin would be affected by the spin of the graviton - the photon's spin might be affected by the energy of the graviton.
    Also, given that LIGO has not detected gravity waves yet, there is hope that
    it may have failed to do so because the waves have a speed greater than light and a smaller amplitude than expected.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2004
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