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Benazir Bhutto Killed in Bomb Blast

  1. Dec 27, 2007 #1
    I'd been seeing only the news of her getting injured while over a dozen people had been killed. Now, it seems, it's official.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/7161590.stm
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 27, 2007 #2
    What a shame. She was a hero in many ways.

    RIP... (very sad)
     
  4. Dec 27, 2007 #3
  5. Dec 27, 2007 #4

    Astronuc

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    Yeah - I just caught the headline.

    Benazir Bhutto was assassinated in a suicide bombing.
     
  6. Dec 27, 2007 #5

    arildno

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    As long as Muslims do not repudiate those elements within the Quran and the hadiths which give moral sanction to violent response to anyone not considered "Muslim enough", or being "insulting to the faith/Prophet", these types of actions will continue unabated, and spread its deadly consequences beyond the Dar-as-Salaam as well.

    It is the moral duty of every Muslim to do that repudiation, in his heart and publicly in his sphere of influence.
     
  7. Dec 27, 2007 #6

    Curious3141

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    This argument is slightly off-topic, because BB was likely killed for political expediency more than any sincere moral umbrage.

    The problem with your stated hope is the Quran is taken as the inerrant word of (their) god, and strict adherence is required of a true, devout Muslim. Passive "slips" would probably be somewhat excusable, but a conscientious, declared repudiation? Think again.

    Now, given that there are internal inconsistencies in the text of the Quran (as indeed with the bible and most other religious texts), I wonder how exactly Muslims can still hold the Quran to be the perfectly transmitted word of god, but that's an argument for another day.
     
  8. Dec 27, 2007 #7
    Ah, the classical religious-violence-isn't-really-about-religion argument. What do you think triggered it? If you claim that it is by political motivation only, then please explain where the Tibetan Buddhist suicide bombers are? Or why the Swedish social democrats didn't blow up the right when the lost the last election?

    Indeed, there is only one possible way to resolve that. Reason and secularization.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2007
  9. Dec 27, 2007 #8
    Religious reason or political or even both, this is just sad. It is sad to see things like this happening in my country. These people really need to stop blowing themselves up to kill other innocent people.
     
  10. Dec 27, 2007 #9

    Ivan Seeking

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    This is terrible!

    It is more than a little frustrating that she knew people were gunning for her but she still left herself open to attack. Did she intend to be a martyr? She wasn't stupid so I have to wonder...
     
  11. Dec 27, 2007 #10
    During interviews she confirmed she knew he life was always in grave danger since returing, but felt her mission and the desire to improve her home country made the risk worthwhile. So I suppose deep down she did intend to be a martyr and knew it was just a matter of time. Whether is will have done any good is yet to be seen.
     
  12. Dec 27, 2007 #11

    arildno

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    Indeed.So, that just means they have the moral responsibility to stop being that.

    Of course, it is not only Muslims who have the moral responsibility. We all have that duty.

    Similarly, all of us have the moral duty to repudiate the repellent maxims of "Mein Kampf", the difference being that the vast majority of us already have done so, and that we don't find it in the slightest "insensitive" to say to Nazis that they have vile attitudes incompatible with the values of a free society.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 27, 2007
  13. Dec 27, 2007 #12
    But surely, it would be a major generalization to claim that all Nazis follows "Mein Kampf"? Surely, you should judge Nazism and the Nazis by the center, rather than the extremist fringe? Isn't such a generalization intolerant? :rolleyes:
     
  14. Dec 27, 2007 #13

    arildno

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    Yeah, I forgot.

    How bad of me..
     
  15. Dec 27, 2007 #14
    Quote:
    This argument is slightly off-topic, because BB was likely killed for political expediency more than any sincere moral umbrage.
    Ah, the classical religious-violence-isn't-really-about-religion argument. What do you think triggered it? If you claim that it is by political motivation only, then please explain where the Tibetan Buddhist suicide bombers are? Or why the Swedish social democrats didn't blow up the right when the lost the last election?

    Quote:
    The problem with your stated hope is the Quran is taken as the inerrant word of (their) god, and strict adherence is required of a true, devout Muslim. Passive "slips" would probably be somewhat excusable, but a conscientious, declared repudiation? Think again.
    Indeed, there is only one possible way to resolve that. Reason and secularization.

    Umm...probably because she is a female candidate running a campaign based around bringing democracy to a country that has been in turmoil for years! I don't mean to be an ass, but that was one of the worst respones I've see out of you (Moridin) on this forum.
     
  16. Dec 27, 2007 #15
    Why would that motivate an act of terror? Because the country has been in turmoil for years? What caused those turmoils? Want to take a guess? :uhh:
     
  17. Dec 27, 2007 #16

    BobG

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    I take it most see no chance Musharraf had anything to do with Bhutto's assassination? He postponed the elections once and only removed emergency rule under some intense pressure. Musharraf would seem to have the most to gain.

    Or else the current events prove Musharraf was right all along and that he shouldn't have bent under international pressure.

    Right now, I think it would be hard to draw any conclusions from Bhutto's murder.
     
  18. Dec 27, 2007 #17

    mheslep

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  19. Dec 27, 2007 #18
    Yeah a brave woman who lived a life of corruption.


    Why don't the news sources present it like it really is? Bhutto is absolutely NO martyr.
     
  20. Dec 27, 2007 #19

    mheslep

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    I certainly am not well read on her days as head of state, but I had the take that she was more like a U.S. Grant in that she allowed through ineptness or inattention corruption to run rampant, but she herself was not chiefly motivated by mere money and power. No?
     
  21. Dec 27, 2007 #20

    Astronuc

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    Well, whether or not they did it - Al Qaeda is claiming responsibility for the assassination.

    Al Qaeda takes credit for Bhutto assassination
    http://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2007/12/al_qaeda_takes_credi.php
    By Bill RoggioDecember 27, 2007 12:26 PM
    Pakistan: Benazir Bhutto assassinated
    http://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2007/12/pakistan_benazir_bhu.php
     
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