Betelgeuse supanova tonight?

  • Thread starter scupydog
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In summary, Betelgeuse is a red star that always seems red because of its cool surface temperature. When Betelgeuse supernova's, we will know it because it will be brighter than a full moon. It is only a few million years old, but does evolve faster than others.
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Hello all I'm here in the uk just lookin at Betelgeuse and for some reason it looks redder tonight has anyone any idea why? thx
 
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  • #2
scupydog said:
Hello all I'm here in the uk just lookin at Betelgeuse and for some reason it looks red tonight has anyone any idea why? thx

Betelgeuse looks red every night...
 
  • #3
Betelgeuse is a red star... it always looks red because it's surface temp is quite cool.

When Betelgeuse supernova's, we will know it. It will be brighter than a full moon due to it's relatively close proximity with Earth.

Editing because I just noticed you said 'redder'. Betelgeuse will likely get more red over time, but that's not a change we'd be able to observe with the naked eye. If it's looking redder to you, I'd assume it's just atmospheric conditions where you're at or possibly light pollution in your location. Or, your mind is just playing tricks on you.
 
  • #4
Guys, I think he means that it's redder than usual.
It might be evolving?
It's only a few million years old, but it does evolve faster than others because of it's high mass. But I have to admit, to be seen from 640 light years away, it is pretty bright. :)
 
  • #5
Debyule said:
Betelgeuse is a red star... it always looks red because it's surface temp is quite cool.

When Betelgeuse supernova's, we will know it. It will be brighter than a full moon due to it's relatively close proximity with Earth.

Editing because I just noticed you said 'redder'. Betelgeuse will likely get more red over time, but that's not a change we'd be able to observe with the naked eye. If it's looking redder to you, I'd assume it's just atmospheric conditions where you're at or possibly light pollution in your location. Or, your mind is just playing tricks on you.

Right, it's far more probably that the increased redness is a function of atmospheric conditions or some terrestrial source rather than any actual change in the star. It's notoriously difficult to predict when a star will nova, and when it does, things usually happen very fast, so there's no way of knowing "oh, Betelgeuse is going to nova in the next 48 hours, keep your eyes peeled."

Heck, could've already done it and we wouldn't know yet.
 
  • #6
scupydog said:
Hello all I'm here in the uk just lookin at Betelgeuse and for some reason it looks redder tonight has anyone any idea why? thx

I don't think in a human life anyone can see a red giant becoming redder just a bit. You saw it redder that night probably because of the atmosphere. I myself one everning saw quite a red moon and it turned out there was a road construction several miles away.
 
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  • #7
I think we are safe. The rotational axis is not pointed in our direction so we need not fear a gamma burst. It will. however, be very, very bright when it goes supernova [which is very likely in the next few million years]
 
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  • #8
scupydog said:
Hello all I'm here in the uk just lookin at Betelgeuse and for some reason it looks redder tonight has anyone any idea why? thx


Not tonight, but in 27 days from now on 3 am Eastern time. Don't miss it!
 
  • #9
I'm not sure if this is why you saw it as redded than usual but http://www.aavso.org/vstar/vsots/1200.shtml" [Broken]
 
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variable star...


Observations by the observers of the AAVSO indicate that Betelgeuse probably reached magnitude 0.2 in 1933 and again in 1942.

At minimum brightness, as in 1927 and 1941, the magnitude may drop below 1.2. Betelgeuse is a semi-regular pulsating red super-giant. It is believed to be at least the size of the orbit of Mars and at maximum diameter may possibly equal the orbit of Jupiter. The star is one of the largest known; spectroscopic studies show that the diameter of the star may vary by about 60% during the whole cycle, a difference considerably larger than the radius of the Earth's orbit!

Reference:
http://www.aavso.org/vstar/vsots/1200.shtml" [Broken]
 
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  • #11
chemisttree said:
I'm not sure if this is why you saw it as redded than usual but http://www.aavso.org/vstar/vsots/1200.shtml" [Broken]

But you are not likely to notice a night to night difference, as it varies from a magnitude of 0.3 to 1.2 with a peak to peak cycle of 14 years or so. It is somewhat of a slacker when compared to a star like Mira, which can go from a magnitude of 10.1 to 2 in 100 days, actually going from being not visible to the naked eye to easily noticeable to the naked eye. (It then takes 200 days to dim back down to 10.1)
 
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  • #12
Thank you for all your replies, its just that it seemed a lot redder than usual that night and i was watching for a few hours its been overcast since so not had a chance to see it recenctly, thanks again all.
 

1. What is a Betelgeuse supernova?

A Betelgeuse supernova refers to the anticipated explosion of the red supergiant star Betelgeuse, which is located in the constellation Orion. It is expected to be one of the brightest supernovae in recorded history.

2. When is the Betelgeuse supernova expected to occur?

While it is impossible to predict the exact date of the Betelgeuse supernova, scientists believe that it could occur anytime within the next 100,000 years.

3. Will the Betelgeuse supernova be visible to the naked eye?

Yes, the Betelgeuse supernova is expected to be visible to the naked eye, potentially even during the daytime. However, the exact brightness and visibility will depend on the distance of Earth from the explosion and the amount of dust and debris in the interstellar medium.

4. What impact will the Betelgeuse supernova have on Earth?

The Betelgeuse supernova is not expected to have any direct impact on Earth. It is located approximately 642 light-years away, which is too far to cause any harm to our planet. However, it will likely be a spectacular astronomical event to observe.

5. How will scientists study the Betelgeuse supernova?

Scientists will use various telescopes and instruments to observe the Betelgeuse supernova and study its effects. This will include analyzing the light and energy emitted from the explosion, as well as studying the remnants of the star after the explosion, known as a supernova remnant.

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