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Billiards physics problem

  1. Nov 26, 2008 #1
    Hello, i an new and i need help with two questions.
    1) In billiards(pool), is it possible for the cue ball, when struck, to stop and transfer all the momentum to the ball it hit? If yes, why does it stop??
    2) Calculate the kinetic energy of Staten Island ( a city in new york) and compare it to an atomic bomb
    Please be detailed and understandable, and provide links if possible..Thanks for the help
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 26, 2008 #2
    Re: billiards..help

    For 1) I would look up elastic and inelastic collisions and make sure I had a thorough understanding of them. Decide which collision describes better a billiards collision. Use conservation of momentum and maybe conservation of KE as appropriate.

    For 2) Use your relevant equations and find a reliable source for your parameters and the energy released from an atomic bomb explosion.
     
  4. Nov 26, 2008 #3
    Re: billiards..help

    The kinetic energy depends on the reference frame. You have to know(decide) in respect to what.
    Do they mean Staten Island as a single object, moving around the Sun with the Earth and also spinning around the axis? Or maybe as a collection of objects moving around? This last one will be some sort of "internal energy".
     
  5. Nov 26, 2008 #4
    Re: billiards..help

    i had to post for namesake. i would help you "but it sounds like homework" so i cant. :biggrin:
     
  6. Nov 26, 2008 #5
    Re: billiards..help

    It wouldn't transfer all of the energy to the ball as some of the energy would be wasted; some energy would be transfered to sound/heat...
     
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