Binary Star Mass

  • #1
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Homework Statement



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How do I show that for a binary star system, if one star has mass ##M_s##, speed ##V_s##, period ##P##, the mass of the other star is given by: ##M_P^3 \approx \frac{V_s^3}{2\pi G} PM_s^2##?

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



[tex]\frac{GM_pM_s}{(a_p+a_s)^2} = \frac{M_s v_s^2}{a_s}[/tex]
Substituting in ##PV_s=2\pi a_s##:
[tex]M_p = \frac{2\pi(a_p+a_s)^2V_s}{PG}[/tex]
Using kepler's second law: ## P^2 = \frac{(a_p+a_s)^3(2\pi)^2}{G(M_p+M_s)} ##:
[tex]M_p^3 = \frac{V_s^3}{2\pi G} P (M_p+M_s)^2[/tex]
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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Seems correct to me. The mass of the planet is more often than not negligible compared to the mass of a star, so [itex] M_{p} << M_{S}[/itex]
 
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  • #3
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Seems correct to me. The mass of the planet is more often than not negligible compared to the mass of a star, so [itex] M_{p} << M_{S}[/itex]
Thanks alot! I'm doing an introductory course to my first ever astrophysics module, so I'm not quite familiar with these things.
 

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