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B Binding energy

  1. Sep 11, 2016 #1
    If the binding energy in nuclear physics is e=mc^2, then would the binding energy of a larger object be:
    e=mv^2
    where v=the velocity of the asteroid?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 11, 2016 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    In the binding energy equation the m is the mass deficit ... does the concept of mass deficit apply to the asteroid?
    In the asteroid equation, v is the speed of the asteroid; in the binding energy, the speed "c" appears in the same place... does that mean that the nucleus is moving at the speed of light?
    In short: no. You cannot do physics by analogy.
     
  4. Sep 11, 2016 #3
    Okay. Thank-you. Do you know how I would be able to find the binding energy of the asteroid?
     
  5. Sep 11, 2016 #4

    Drakkith

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    There are several types of binding energy. Which one are you looking for? Gravitational? Nuclear? Chemical?
     
  6. Sep 11, 2016 #5
    I think gravitational. I need to know if a bomb would explode an asteroid or not, and I was going to do a comparison on the energy of the bomb (which I've already figured out), to the binding energy of the asteroid.
     
  7. Sep 11, 2016 #6

    Drakkith

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  8. Sep 11, 2016 #7
  9. Sep 11, 2016 #8

    mfb

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    Note that the binding energy of an asteroid also contributes to its mass via E=mc2 as every energy in the rest frame does, but the contribution is completely negligible.
     
  10. Sep 11, 2016 #9

    Simon Bridge

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    ... if the idea is to destroy the asteroid before it arrives at some target, detonating it won't remove it's kinetic energy (though distributing the bits over a big volume can reduce the amount of mass that strikes the target. Phil Plait has an artical about it.
     
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