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Bioactive whey

  1. Apr 4, 2012 #1
    hi,

    i wanted to purchase bioactive whey protein isolate but the ones sold in my country are flavored and i had read somewhere that if the whey powder is flavored then it has been denatured.is it true?
    so now i wanted to know what would be the correct method to make it from fresh milk.for how long should i boil the milk and at medium or low flame? please tell me the exact procedure.i will be really very grateful to you.

    thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 5, 2012 #2
    Do you know what your stomach does to proteins? Better yet, do you know what your saliva does to proteins?

    "Bioactive" whey branding is false advertising, plain and simple. It literally does not mean anything in that context. Proteins are denatured and their peptide bonds are cleaved by proteases and your stomach acid anyway. There's absolutely no benefit to whey protein having its tertiary structure before you eat it.
     
  4. Apr 6, 2012 #3
    ummm...you just crushed all my dreams for raising glutathione levels...is there any other way to do so..because consuming glutathione will not increase its levels no matter we take reduced one or inject?? so please help!
     
  5. Apr 6, 2012 #4
    Why do you think whey protein will raise glutathione levels? And why is this unique to whey protein, and not any other form of protein? Also, what does higher order structure of dietary protein have to do with glutathione levels?

    This sounds like some crackpot homeopathic mumbo jumbo.

    Please post references from peer reviewed journals. Maybe if we get a look at what you're reading, we can discuss this further.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2012
  6. Apr 6, 2012 #5
    hi,

    thanks for your reply!
    i have been very much into getting some method to raise glutathione levels naturally.there are lots of supplements for oral glutathione in form of tablets but they are useless.if you read this article then you can understand

    raising glutathione seems to me to have lots of benefits for body so i am very much interested.
    and undenatured is essential because normal whey which is pasteurized kills all bioactivity.
    there are other ways to increase the levels of glutathione which include taking n-acetylcysteine but this is not natural and very safe in the long run while taking whey protein isolate has no side effects.

    so if anybody can throw some light on this , it would be really kind and helpful too.

    this is the link for the product:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 6, 2012
  7. Apr 6, 2012 #6

    bobze

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    You are reading and falling for hooey.

    Whey protein has the highest bioavailability of any protein meal you're ever going to eat. Of course heat denatures proteins at high order structure (like quaternary, tertiary and secondary) and if it is hot enough will even break some peptide bonds--Which is really doing your body a favor, as you have to break peptide bonds to absorb it anyway.

    Most amino acids are absorbed via single AA transporters or some dipeptide transporters. Cooking food and denaturing protein makes it more accessible to your proteases who are going to cut peptide bonds to make the AAs available to your body. For example look at the bioavailability of protein from raw eggs vs cooked eggs (if your too lazy to look up here's the spoiler; cooked egg has a much greater bioavailability for AAs).

    If you are eating healthy and not exposed to lots of undue oxidative stress you don't need to worry about ingesting glutathione--Your body is quite capable of producing enough of it on your own (along with the other antioxidants it uses, rather peculiar to single out this one). If you are really worried about it, then eat more precursors to gultathione (cystine, glycine, glutamic acid)--Which you would get plenty of with a protein supplement like whey or protein bars (or just by eating a healthy and varied diet)......
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 6, 2012
  8. Apr 6, 2012 #7

    bobze

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    A free lesson in smart skepticism;

    There is just as much, if not more, bad information on the internet as there is good information. When you run across a website who's about me page reads;

    and who have no health related credentials you should be skeptical about anything they are writing or selling--Such as "raising your glutathione levels"
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 6, 2012
  9. Apr 7, 2012 #8

    Monique

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    Instead of passing an immediate judgement, it is better to research a topic first. Bioactive peptides are known to exist:

    Invited review: Physiological properties of bioactive peptides obtained from whey proteins J Dairy Sci. 2010 Feb;93(2):437-55.
     
  10. Apr 7, 2012 #9

    bobze

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    Monique,

    I don't think that is what Aroc was talking about. If you look around the nets at websites selling "Bioactive Whey"--They are promoting the nonsense that "normal" whey protein is inadequate because the pasteurization process destroys the "protein" (when really here they mean amino acids) and make them unavailable to the body.

    Rightly as Aroc pointed it out--Its a marketing gimmick, plain and simple. The way that scientists use the word "bioactive" and the way these whey producers and raw food gurus are using it are vastly different and is in deed, a bit of false advertising (similar to the thousands of examples of other pseudoscience people who take scientific sounding words and misuse them).

    The bottom line for the OP is that whey, despite being pasteurized, has the highest bioavailability for AAs out of any protein meal you could eat.
     
  11. Apr 7, 2012 #10

    Monique

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    Pick any product in the store and it will likely contain false advertising. That is not called pseudoscience, but marketing. In the Netherlands they've recently implemented strict regulations that any claim made should be supported by evidence, I'm not sure how strict the rules are in other countries.

    To the whey, when a protein is hydrolyzed it is broken down in the amino acids, so this destroys bioactive peptides. Raw whey will also not contain bioactive peptides, see the review. It needs to go through a refinement step. That's what the OP should've been told.

    Since we are not talking about a particular product, you can not make a judgement whether the marketing claim made is true or not.

    Just look at the yoghurt market, many manufacturers claim they've added bioactive bacteria. Most of those claims will be made up by marketeers, but some yoghurts could contain bacteria with biological value.
     
  12. Apr 7, 2012 #11
    Of course. We wouldn't see things like gluten sensitivity if the stomach was a metaphorical black hole that just demolished everything that went into it. We wouldn't have to worry about parasites in that case, either, but we do. In this particular case, however, it's nonsense. Sports supplements, above all other things, are rife with false claims and marketing.
     
  13. Apr 7, 2012 #12

    Monique

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    What exactly is nonsense? As said, milk-derived bioactive peptides and their health implications are part of scientific peer-reviewed literature.
     
  14. Apr 7, 2012 #13
    Taking anything you see on a product label in GNC at face value is foolish. Supplements are not FDA approved and it's best to be skeptical. I'm not knocking the research, I'm knocking the inflated claims by supplement companies for marketing purposes. This is especially true for unsubstantiated claims such as whey protein elevating glutathione levels, which this thread was originally about.
     
  15. Jul 29, 2012 #14
    Does anyone have some reliable sources for the statements posted here? I would like more information on whey protein side effects.
     
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